For most of us, the desire to have your own inflatable hot tub comes when the temperature begins to drop and the weather becomes colder. You long for the times when you could easily lounge in a Jacuzzi at your favorite spa salon. But often, the cost for professional spa treatments can add up over time prompting you to just stay indoors and cozy up next to your heater instead. However, those days are long gone. A practical option available for you now is to purchase your own inflatable portable hot tub.

Our only concern was that we found no inflatable hot tubs with built-in seats. Now, there is a good reason for this, mainly because you don’t need them. It is very comfortable to sit in, but a little strange at first if you are used to having seats in your hot tubs or spa. The others reason being an inflating issue. If seats were part of the tub, they might be a weak spot and susceptible to stress tears. Also, less water is needed, which is more cost effective in maintenance costs.


You’ll notice right away that saltwater feels softer, almost like a mineral bath. The salt used is sodium chloride, which is essentially regular table salt. It’s also the same salt that is in the ocean, but only about a tenth of the amount. Get a 40 lb. bag of pool salt, add 2 lbs. per 100 gallons of spa water, and you’re ready to go! The salt is very cheap, about $7 per bag. The slightly salty spa water leaves your skin feeling refreshed, not irritated, like bathing in mineral spring water.
Hot SpringⓇ Spas are the hot tubs for hot tub people. Our premium and luxury spas are built with top-quality components, maximizing energy efficiency and durability. Strong pumps provide pressure via dozens of hydromassage jets. Ergonomic seats keep you comfortably in place as you melt into your warm soak. Entertainment options provide the perfect mood for solitary relaxation or social get-togethers. If you’re looking for a hot tub, don’t go halfway—go Hot Spring. Click here to download our brochure!
Savings – Here was a big one for us and our budget. An in-ground hot tub or spa can cost from $12,000 to over $20,000 by the time you are done with cranes, excavation, landscapers, masons, plumbers and construction crews, and we are not even talking about the maintenance costs. Acrylic or prefab hot tubs are more cost effective, but you still have the cost of installation. See How To Look After Your Inflatable Hot Tub.
Because a plug and play hot tub is not hard wired into a permanent outside gfci box it makes it easier to take with you if you ever move. Or if your a renter you can have a hot tub and take it with you when you buy a house or rent another one! Generally plug and play spas are smaller and lighter making them much more portable and easy move, but not having to worry about installing another 220v electrical service at your next home makes the move easier as well.

Unlike certain recreational water gadgets, you can maintain an inflatable tub easily. It’s not complicated as all you need to do is keep the water at a specific pH and clean out the filters regularly. It’s also a great consolation that the filtration system comes attached to the tub so that you don’t have to set it up or mess with it in any way. Just clean the filters often, and it will work perfectly.

We hope that we have given you some information that will help you in your decision to purchase an inflatable or hard hot tub. Part of our research was in reading actual reviews of verified owners, and we encourage you to do this too. Also, make sure you know the return policies and the manufacturer’s warranties too. Have fun in your hot tub, we sure are!


The downfall we found would be the setup. It’s not like the inflatable spas that you can have set up within 15-20 minutes. While the manufacturer states this spa can be set up within 30 minutes or less, there are some reviewers that state otherwise. In fact, some people say it can take up to two hours because there is a lot to set-up – there’s a lot of pieces that you have to put together carefully. Personally, we feel this is understandable because it’s not an inflatable hot tub and once it’s put together, you can leave it up.
An inflatable hot tub, to state the obvious, is filled with air and air is actually a very very good insulator. Think about double glazed windows. What makes them effective is a layer of air. We have already noted earlier that inflatable hot tubs have thick sidewalls, up to 10 inches thick. This actually provides great thermal protection from heat loss on the sides. Couple this fact with some insulation underneath the hot tub and a decent cover and you have a hot tub that is reasonably well protected from heat loss. Not as good as more expensive models but not to shabby either and one that can certainly be managed.
It can accommodate a maximum of 4 people at once. It has a water capacity of 217 gallons, and the rapid heating system is able to raise the temperature of the water by 2-3°F per hour. The maximum heat capability that it features is of 103°F. It comes with 88 air jets that deliver a soothing massage. To ensure that the water in it will be of a great quality and safe to sit in, it features a useful water filtration system.
If you are looking for a hot tub that provides a soothing bubble bath, requires little maintenance and has a relatively affordable price tag the Coleman Lay Z with filter cartridges could be a quality option. Coleman products are reputed for their durability and comfort factors. This product too does justice to the Coleman name. With features such as the Lay-Z massage system, integrated water filtration, fast heating and six filter cartridges, this hot tub could be a good purchase.
Usually costing around $4,000 to $9,000 depending on type and size and location to be installed. But going the inflatable spa way will run you around $500, with no setup costs. And if you will only be using it part of the year, you simply deflate it and store it away. There are no costs of maintaining it to keep it from looking like something that the creature from the black lagoon would like to hide out in. Oh, and did we mention, to heat it up and keep it heated will run around $8-$12 a month depending on your electricity prices per kWh.
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