The first thing that comes to mind when you think about a hot tub is luxury. While it is true that hard-side models come at inaccessible prices for most, the same cannot be said about inflating tubs. Inflatables provide all the benefits of traditional hot tubs, but they come with their own set of advantages, the most important being the fact that they are cheaper. To learn more about these amazing additions that you can make to your home, read the following lines.
Since we started reviewing inflatable hot tubs in 2015, we have spent more than 40 hours finding some of the best tubs on the market and then did in-depth research to discover stand-out features. We have contacted manufacturers with numerous questions to clarify issues and discover unique features. We also consulted with professionals and industry insiders to increase our expertise and get informed opinions about the best tubs out there. 

You get a ground mat in the pack so that you have some insulation between the tub and the ground and it is also a bubble mat so you get a little extra padding when you’re sitting on the bottom of the tub. The hot tub has bubble jets around the base which gives you a soothing massage in water that you can heat up to 104F to give you an all round relaxing experience. Check out the pros and cons below.
It is true that inflatable hot tubs are less durable compared to a built-in hot tub. But it’s very difficult to effort built in hot tub as they are very very costly. Many inflatable hot tub reviews highlighted this product is cost efficient, Affordable, Easy to portable and durable. Inflatable spa tubs last more if you follow the maintenance guide and precautions while using  it.

Easily, the biggest selling point of this product is the Lay-Z-Massage system which provides with more relaxation that what any other tub delivers. As you receive the soothing massage, your muscles and joints receive the needed attention to relieve any pain or stress felt in them. Those who have physically demanding jobs or who practice sports will find the massage system very helpful when it comes to the recovery of their hurt joints.
Try to imagine how big that actually is. Get a tape measure out and use it to gauge the size. A better idea is to mark the inner diameter out on the ground. Use a rope or a garden hose to physically map out the size. When you have your circle on the ground, sit in it. Ideally get some others to do the same. You should be able to get a good idea of how many people you personally would feel comfortable with.
One of the major perks of having your own portable hot tub is its mobility and easy installation. Unlike the regular ones, having an inflatable spa does not consume a permanent space because you can easily wrap it up and set aside. You can have it stored out in your backyard on a sunny day, or pack it up and take it inside during winter. And how can we forget taking this fun little amusement on vacations and weekend getaways? I mean, blow-up hot tubs can really be your best friend.
Portable or not, an inflatable hot tub still represents a significant investment. Inexpensive models run around $300 or so, and high-end inflatable spas can cost $1000 or more. Before you get ready to spend that kind of money, you should have a pretty good idea of how often you intend on using it. Spending $900 to soak in a hot tub once a month is a poor investment.

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The Lay-Z-Spa comes with a fitted top cover, made of the same green faux-leather material that covers the outside of the tub. A foil lining helps the top cover to better retain heat, and an inflatable disc sits atop the tub, underneath the fitted cover. Around the outside of the tub you’ll find several clips to secure the cover, as well as built-in handles for repositioning the inflated tub before filling it with water.
When setup, this heated inflatable spa really looks like an proper hot tub. Its deep blue colour is splendid for what it is and what its used for. The pump is the same shade, and adds to the functional pool effect. White is just not practical for outside use, and many dark colours look gloomy or scruffy. This integrated pool and pump look classy wherever you put them.
We have been reviewing inflatable hot tubs since 2015. In that time we have spent more than 40 hours researching them to find the best portable hot tubs on the market. The best hot tub we found was the Coleman Lay-Z-Spa 54131E. The Coleman hot tub is attractive and built for durability with a synthetic leather exterior, polyester-mesh-enforced PVC walls and vertical beams to prevent it from buckling and bending after repeated use. It has 120 bubble jets and can heat to 104 degrees Fahrenheit, and it can fit up to six adults.  
It can fit a maximum of 6 people at once, which is more than enough room for small gatherings between friends. It can heat up to a maximum of 104 degrees Fahrenheit, and there is an automatic start and stop timer which ensures the spa session won’t exceed the duration you desire and select. Its 242-gallon capacity shows just how spacious this tub is, while the 77-inch by 28-inch size makes it easy for you to find a place for it in the backyard or garden.
If your looking how to order, there are several companies selling a huge range, so it can be difficult to choose the right one. Ask yourself how often you will be using the Jacuzzi, how many people should it seat, where is it going to go? Check out the online comments and do your research as although a cheap inflatable spa sounds great you will still want the top quality you can afford.

It does exactly what it says on the tin. When you want to use it, you just pump it up, fill it up with water, and add your chemicals. Once you are done it is simply a case of emptying it out, letting it dry and deflating the spa. You can then leave it in storage until its next use. Most of us will fill it and use it for months! Others will take it out only on special occasions.
Another drawback to certain models of inflatable hot tubs is the location of the filter or filters. While many models place the filter right inside the heater/pump unit for quick access, some models place the filters along the bottom inner portion of the spa, so changing them becomes a much more involved process than just opening the pump unit and popping in a new filter.
Try to imagine how big that actually is. Get a tape measure out and use it to gauge the size. A better idea is to mark the inner diameter out on the ground. Use a rope or a garden hose to physically map out the size. When you have your circle on the ground, sit in it. Ideally get some others to do the same. You should be able to get a good idea of how many people you personally would feel comfortable with.
It is usually transferred effortlessly around, also it can also end up being used on holidays when you are traveling. In many instances, a blow up spa is generally smaller sized than the usual ordinary, fixed hot spa jacuzzi. This really is both a benefit and a drawback since it provides much less room for individuals to take a seat in it, additionally, it takes significantly less time and energy to warm up.​ ​
Considering all the hard work that goes into putting up a regular hot tub, an inflatable one is easy to own and maintain. You inflate it and add water, and you have a great soak spot. You don’t even need more than one person for the job; you can set up your hot tub on your own in the comfort of your home without a struggle. On the other hand, there is no avoiding the use of hot tub experts when you want to install a regular hot tub unless you are an expert yourself.
Unlike certain recreational water gadgets, you can maintain an inflatable tub easily. It’s not complicated as all you need to do is keep the water at a specific pH and clean out the filters regularly. It’s also a great consolation that the filtration system comes attached to the tub so that you don’t have to set it up or mess with it in any way. Just clean the filters often, and it will work perfectly.
One of our friends actually thought of a practical way of circumventing this shortcoming. They live in New York but are still able to use it during winter. Their technique is to use it indoors. They have a spare room in their house dedicated to their portable hot tub. It’s one great way of taking advantage of an inflatable spa’s portability as they would relocate it again outside when winter is over.

This Coleman hot tub has a bright green outer layer with a white inner lining. It’s 77 inches in diameter and can seat 4-6 people although it is probably more comfortable with only 4. It can be set up in the garden or in the garage or basement wherever you want to place it as long as it’s a flat surface. All you need is the ability to plug it into an electrical outlet and be able to fill it with water and have a drain within reach when you have to empty it.
Usually costing around $4,000 to $9,000 depending on type and size and location to be installed. But going the inflatable spa way will run you around $500, with no setup costs. And if you will only be using it part of the year, you simply deflate it and store it away. There are no costs of maintaining it to keep it from looking like something that the creature from the black lagoon would like to hide out in. Oh, and did we mention, to heat it up and keep it heated will run around $8-$12 a month depending on your electricity prices per kWh.
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