We live in a multipurpose, multitasking world. Cell phones are now computers, capable of performing thousands of tasks. Printers come with fax machines, copiers, and scanners built in. Trains equipped with wireless internet allow commuters to work on their way to and from the office. Couches fold out into beds; pool tables convert into ping-pong tables. It’s no surprise that in such a world, in-ground pools are often built with in-ground hot tubs attached.
If you’re not so sure about the Coleman spa, then you may be interested in the SaluSpa Paris AirJet Inflatable hot tub. Currently, this is one of the most beautiful tubs on the market due to the impressive LED lighting system. Not only does it have a lighting system that is out of the world, it also has numerous air jets and of course, a rapid heating system. Will this be the one you want? Let’s move forward and take a look at it …
The maintenance of inflatable hot tubs should be a breeze, right? Keep the filters in good condition by removing and rinsing them every few days or so, depending on how much it has been used. Another downside is the location filters. Some models place the filters inside the heater or pump for easy access, while others put it along the bottom inner portion of the tub. This makes cleaning and changing it a more demanding task.
Many people enjoy the relaxation and luxury provided by a Jacuzzi spa, but can’t afford to purchase one of their own. Traditional hot tubs can cost upwards of€1000 as a base price. Pair this with the fact that they often require a team of professionals to install and setup and the cost becomes prohibitive for many households. In response to this issue, some companies have created products to try and introduce a hot tub into the lower price ranges. Businesses such as Lay-Z-Spa, Intex, and M-Spa now offer more compact, inflatable spas that can work perfectly in the garden. Offering numerous benefits that traditional hot tubs lack, inflatable options are growing in popularity and desirability
In a worst case scenario the part that blows up the inflatable hot tub can malfunction, meaning that you’re left with a deflated piece of strong plastic. Portable hot tubs provide a great sense of security in that their main parts are the control panel and the heating element, which are all built into the tub itself. With inflatable hot tubs having a separate heater/blower, it takes something as simple as a person forgetting to pack it or that piece short circuiting to ruin everyone’s fun.
If your looking how to order, there are several companies selling a huge range, so it can be difficult to choose the right one. Ask yourself how often you will be using the Jacuzzi, how many people should it seat, where is it going to go? Check out the online comments and do your research as although a cheap inflatable spa sounds great you will still want the top quality you can afford.
The biggest issue with the Hawaii Air Jet is the same that besets all SaluSpa products – the obnoxious placement of the control panel. The massaging jets are great, but the last thing I want to do is half to get out of the spa to turn them on, and I inevitably forget to turn them on before I get in. This is a small complaint, of course, and doesn’t diminish the value or the durability of this hot tub.
Portable or not, an inflatable hot tub still represents a significant investment. Inexpensive models run around $300 or so, and high-end inflatable spas can cost $1000 or more. Before you get ready to spend that kind of money, you should have a pretty good idea of how often you intend on using it. Spending $900 to soak in a hot tub once a month is a poor investment.
One person can set up an inflatable hot tub, whereas as a construction crew of plumbers, electricians and possibly even a crane operator is needed for a hard hot tub. Also, a hard acrylic hot tub will weigh between 400-900 lbs. (181-408 kg.) so moving it around is not an option. On the other hand, an inflatable hot tub can be drained and rolled to another location.
Usually costing around $4,000 to $9,000 depending on type and size and location to be installed. But going the inflatable spa way will run you around $500, with no setup costs. And if you will only be using it part of the year, you simply deflate it and store it away. There are no costs of maintaining it to keep it from looking like something that the creature from the black lagoon would like to hide out in. Oh, and did we mention, to heat it up and keep it heated will run around $8-$12 a month depending on your electricity prices per kWh.
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