Least expensive type. Inflatable hot tubs are less costly than other types. Some go for as little as $350, though the largest and most elaborate versions can cost nearly as much as some budget above-ground models, such as the Lifesmart Bermuda. Installation is also not much of a consideration, since an inflatable spa can be set up on almost any level surface. User reviews indicate that inflatable models tend to lose heat during use, which can limit their energy efficiency.
One of the common gripes about these spa’s is the fact that when you use the bubble massage system you can’t use the heater at the same time. The bubbles have a 30 minute auto shut off and in that time the temperature can drop a few degrees. The bubbles going through the water can make it feel a bit cooler too. To be fair this is an issue with most portable hot tubs with bubble jets. It’s easy to switch the heater back on as soon as the bubbles are finished but the temperature only rises a few degrees an hour.
Backyard Flexibility. Keeping your pool and your spa entirely separate allows for more flexibility in the design of your backyard oasis. For example, your spa can be located on or in your deck, while your pool lies down a garden path from your deck’s stairs. Your children can play in the pool while you relax in the hot tub, enjoying your calm retreat.
If you are looking for a hot tub that provides a soothing bubble bath, requires little maintenance and has a relatively affordable price tag the Coleman Lay Z with filter cartridges could be a quality option. Coleman products are reputed for their durability and comfort factors. This product too does justice to the Coleman name. With features such as the Lay-Z massage system, integrated water filtration, fast heating and six filter cartridges, this hot tub could be a good purchase.

Your inflatable hot tub should not be placed in an environment with temperatures less than 4ºC or 40ºF. This can cause irreversible damage to your hot tub’s pump and heater. If your inflatable hot tub is placed in your patio, backyard or lawn, it is best to transfer it to a warmer location inside your home or just pack and store it away during the winter season.
Unlike certain recreational water gadgets, you can maintain an inflatable tub easily. It’s not complicated as all you need to do is keep the water at a specific pH and clean out the filters regularly. It’s also a great consolation that the filtration system comes attached to the tub so that you don’t have to set it up or mess with it in any way. Just clean the filters often, and it will work perfectly.

Portable spas used outside tend to lose heat quicker than those inside, while you would also use less power if you used it every day. The initial heating up of the water takes some time and pushed up your heating cost, whereas the more often you use it, the more the water temperature stays the same as you would only be increasing heat when the water cools down.

Slow To Heat – These have electric heaters and not gas like the in ground or acrylic may have. The rule of thumb is to expect about one hour wait time for every 2 to 3 degree rise in temperature. So if you don’t plan to keep it on all week, start heating it up Saturday morning or Friday night for the weekend. But this is also a money saver since these spas need much less water and have awesome insulation you could keep it heated at all times for pennies more. Or be a diligent saver and only heat it up when you know you want to use it. Just give yourself some head-start time.
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