Is important to make clear here a fact about the Lay-Z-Spa series. It is a sub-brand of the British Bestway company, and their tubs sold and manufactured under this name are all British. When you see then being sold in dollars in America you are seeing imported products the brand is retailing abroad. Coleman is a brand chosen by Bestway to manufacture some of the Lay-Z-Spa series models in America, often exclusive here, which is the case of this inflatable hot tub. The Coleman’s Lay-Z 90363E  follows the formula of the Palm Springs model, it has a 77-inch diameter, is 28-inch tall and support up to 254 gallons of water. Up to 6 people can fit comfortably, and it comes with a heating system up to 104ºF and a standard two-cartridge filter. Like all previous models, it includes the pump to set up the tub, which will take less than 20 minutes, the electrical rate is 110-120V and the set of jets is also the bubble-only patch of 120 jets.
The salt cell used for saltwater hot tubs is a titanium coated electrolytic cell, which will eventually lose enough of its coating to stop producing enough chlorine. Spa salt cells usually last 2-5 years, depending on the model. At that point, you can replace just the cell (not the power supply). Keeping your cell clean (some models are self-cleaning), and not using it for cold spa water (below 60° F), are key to a long cell life.
The walls are made with six-layer reinforced PVC designed to resist tears and leaking, and the inside supports 108 relaxing air jets for soothing hydrotherapy and pain relief. The spa also features a built-in heater for more convenient design, and features an LED control panel close at hand that makes it easy to activate the jets or manage the temperature inside the spa.

The second most common complaint was the failure of the pump operation. Unfortunately, for these negative reviewers, the pump stopped working after only a few uses. Once they survived the customer service experience, the were granted warranty clearance and given a new pump. However, it was an annoying experience for them to have to replace the pump so early into the process.
Once the set is fully inflated, you have to fill it in on your own, making use of a garden hose for example. When the tub is ready to use, you can adjust how much hot you want the water to be and for how long you want it to keep heating. The same goes for the jet heads functioning, all can be adjusted and timed by digital controlling. The main difference between the system of an inflatable and a traditional hot tub is the disposition of the motor/engine that filters, heats and blows water and air. On traditional tubs it will be placed built-in, while on the inflatable one it is a sided appliance.
Portable spas used outside tend to lose heat quicker than those inside, while you would also use less power if you used it every day. The initial heating up of the water takes some time and pushed up your heating cost, whereas the more often you use it, the more the water temperature stays the same as you would only be increasing heat when the water cools down.
If you want to make full use of your hot tub experience, make sure to purchase hot tub accessories like glass holders, headrests, inflatable benches, extra filter cartridges, pool/tub sponges, and spa seats. These accessories are not included in a basic inflatable hot tub setup. Spare parts and accessories can also be purchased from After Sales suppliers or from your hot tub’s manufacturer.
It has enough room to sit 4 people according to the manufacturer. As with all other “4 person hot tubs”, get ready for some intimate time with your buddies. This is fine if you are close friends, but not so comfortable if you are not. The exterior layer is a brownish synthetic leather. It is a matter of personal preference, but we don’t like it at all.
This luxurious portable spa is in the mid-price range, but comes with some premium features. As well as its own lighting, the sturdy circular construction is supported by I Beam technology, to give extra stability. The shell and lining are made of extremely durable, puncture resistant material. You can use it outside, or you might want to take it into a more private area.
Usually costing around $4,000 to $9,000 depending on type and size and location to be installed. But going the inflatable spa way will run you around $500, with no setup costs. And if you will only be using it part of the year, you simply deflate it and store it away. There are no costs of maintaining it to keep it from looking like something that the creature from the black lagoon would like to hide out in. Oh, and did we mention, to heat it up and keep it heated will run around $8-$12 a month depending on your electricity prices per kWh.
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