Saltwater hot tubs are still using chlorine, but it’s not your father’s chlorine! It’s pure chlorine, or hypochlorous acid, and it can’t be compared to the tablet type. I love the salt system in my spa. I’ve had it installed for nearly a year now, and other than add some replacement salt, I haven’t had to touch it. I still test the water and shock the spa weekly. But my water balance is more steady, and the water feels and smells great! The best part? There’s no corrosion damage!
Maybe the best benefit of a saltwater hot tub is that you no longer need to store bromine or chlorine tablets. You should still shock the spa, so keep a granular oxidizer on hand, but you can use chlorine-free MPS if you prefer. Spa salt systems make their own chlorine, so it’s still a chlorinated spa. However, the chlorine is created naturally, without binders or additives. It’s pure chlorine.
The main issue against saltwater hot tubs is that salt causes corrosion. At levels of 2,000-3,000 ppm, there should be no worry about damage to finishes and pool equipment. There is one material in particular that doesn’t like salt, that being Buna rubber, which some pump shaft seals are made of. Again, at normal levels, there should be no concern. But if your pump seal begins to leak, we do have pump shaft seal made for high salt or ozone conditions.

The price is a marvel, and it’s very democratic. What it really means is that the inflatable hot tub experience is really no long exclusive for the well-off. How long will it take you to save $400 for a tub? Probably not all that long, right. And it doesn’t add much to your electricity bill, with some people saying it will add about $80 to you monthly electricity expenses. That’s for keeping it ready every day!

One of the best things that inflatable hot tubs come with is excellent flexibility. As a matter of fact, they are not only flexible, you can very easily break it down and move it absolutely anywhere you would like, either in or out of your yard. You not only have to choose between a solid, portable, above ground hot tub model or the in ground model anymore, now there is a better option to buy. If you also consider the inflatable hot tub ratings you will know how much people are enjoying them.
We have been reviewing inflatable hot tubs since 2015. In that time we have spent more than 40 hours researching them to find the best portable hot tubs on the market. The best hot tub we found was the Coleman Lay-Z-Spa 54131E. The Coleman hot tub is attractive and built for durability with a synthetic leather exterior, polyester-mesh-enforced PVC walls and vertical beams to prevent it from buckling and bending after repeated use. It has 120 bubble jets and can heat to 104 degrees Fahrenheit, and it can fit up to six adults.  
The downfall we found would be the setup. It’s not like the inflatable spas that you can have set up within 15-20 minutes. While the manufacturer states this spa can be set up within 30 minutes or less, there are some reviewers that state otherwise. In fact, some people say it can take up to two hours because there is a lot to set-up – there’s a lot of pieces that you have to put together carefully. Personally, we feel this is understandable because it’s not an inflatable hot tub and once it’s put together, you can leave it up.
For most of us, the desire to have your own inflatable hot tub comes when the temperature begins to drop and the weather becomes colder. You long for the times when you could easily lounge in a Jacuzzi at your favorite spa salon. But often, the cost for professional spa treatments can add up over time prompting you to just stay indoors and cozy up next to your heater instead. However, those days are long gone. A practical option available for you now is to purchase your own inflatable portable hot tub.
It has heavy-duty construction and a good selection of accessories at a very reasonable price. The Fiber-Tech construction combines reinforced laminated PVC with a layer of fibrous material. The tub measures 77 inches across and 28 inches deep; it holds 210 gallons of water and can support four adults at a time. The thermal ground cloth this inflatable spa comes with protects the bottom of the tub while adding a layer of insulation. The fitted cover has child-protected safety locks and a foil lining to help retain heat. It has a combination pump and heater that circulates water first through a built-in water softener then a water filter. This is an uncommon feature for an inflatable hot tub. Using the digital controls on the heater, you can set the temperature to anywhere between 68 and 104 degrees Fahrenheit. You also activate the 120 jets using the digital readout. The jets are powered by the same air pump you use to inflate the tub. An included air pressure gauge helps you inflate the tub to just the right level, and a specialized wrench is included to tighten the valve when needed. The tub comes with a carry bag for easy storage and portability. Other accessories include a package of three-way test strips (which test pH levels, alkalinity and free chlorine levels), a floating chlorine dispenser and two filter cartridges. Intex backs the PureSpa with a 12-month warranty, which includes both the tub and the combined pump and heater unit.
Welfare: for last, and surely not least, these tubs will offer what all hot tubs are meant to: a pleasant relaxing moment to chill out. While the massaging jet models are much more therapeutic as they can provide the benefits of hydro massage tubs, even the bubble models offer a relaxing and comfortable moment as they sooth the skin smoothly. You share all this with your relatives and friends as hot tubs make some of the best social gathering spots in any season. Who doesn’t love a chat immersed on bubbling hot water?

Now let me tell you about the Construction of the Tub. The Technology used to build the tub is TriTech technology. The Miami AirJet is made up of 3 ply mesh core with reinforced polyester. So the Tub is taken care to survive in harsh conditions without getting Punctured. And you also get I Beam Construction. The Spa is made so tough that you can even sit on the walls of the tub without it getting bent.
Usually costing around $4,000 to $9,000 depending on type and size and location to be installed. But going the inflatable spa way will run you around $500, with no setup costs. And if you will only be using it part of the year, you simply deflate it and store it away. There are no costs of maintaining it to keep it from looking like something that the creature from the black lagoon would like to hide out in. Oh, and did we mention, to heat it up and keep it heated will run around $8-$12 a month depending on your electricity prices per kWh.
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