Also called ‘fixed,’ ‘traditional,’ and even built-in tubs, regular hot tubs miss the big feature of portability. Portable or movable tubs work for everyone irrespective of how much space you have in your home. You can easily set it up with ease, and in case of an inflatable hot tub, you can store it with utmost ease without wasting any precious real estate.

Also factor in the mechanical portion and that the parts inside serve a bigger role when in use, so are usually multi-mechanical beasts that have a lot of expensive internals. The more internal moving parts you have, the more expensive the product is, regardless of its origin. It should be noted that although most portable hot tubs end up in the medium to high price point, inflatable hot tubs are not that much cheaper than the bulk of portable hot tubs if you remove shipping costs.

The Lay-Z-Spa comes with a fitted top cover, made of the same green faux-leather material that covers the outside of the tub. A foil lining helps the top cover to better retain heat, and an inflatable disc sits atop the tub, underneath the fitted cover. Around the outside of the tub you’ll find several clips to secure the cover, as well as built-in handles for repositioning the inflated tub before filling it with water.
Least expensive type. Inflatable hot tubs are less costly than other types. Some go for as little as $350, though the largest and most elaborate versions can cost nearly as much as some budget above-ground models, such as the Lifesmart Bermuda. Installation is also not much of a consideration, since an inflatable spa can be set up on almost any level surface. User reviews indicate that inflatable models tend to lose heat during use, which can limit their energy efficiency.

What you must not forget to do every week is to remove the filter from the hot tub and clean it. Read the user manual that the tub comes with to see where the filter is located, and clean it by simply wiping away the debris that has gathered on it with a cloth or a paper towel while holding it under running tap water. If you notice that large debris has gathered in the tub, immediately check the filter to see if any of that debris is trapped in it to avoid any damage from being done to it.
One of the major perks of having your own portable hot tub is its mobility and easy installation. Unlike the regular ones, having an inflatable spa does not consume a permanent space because you can easily wrap it up and set aside. You can have it stored out in your backyard on a sunny day, or pack it up and take it inside during winter. And how can we forget taking this fun little amusement on vacations and weekend getaways? I mean, blow-up hot tubs can really be your best friend.
Usually costing around $4,000 to $9,000 depending on type and size and location to be installed. But going the inflatable spa way will run you around $500, with no setup costs. And if you will only be using it part of the year, you simply deflate it and store it away. There are no costs of maintaining it to keep it from looking like something that the creature from the black lagoon would like to hide out in. Oh, and did we mention, to heat it up and keep it heated will run around $8-$12 a month depending on your electricity prices per kWh.
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