Also factor in the mechanical portion and that the parts inside serve a bigger role when in use, so are usually multi-mechanical beasts that have a lot of expensive internals. The more internal moving parts you have, the more expensive the product is, regardless of its origin. It should be noted that although most portable hot tubs end up in the medium to high price point, inflatable hot tubs are not that much cheaper than the bulk of portable hot tubs if you remove shipping costs.
The jet heads here are called HydroJets and as we said, have a duo functionality. There are eight big heads that can also be adjusted by hand to the direction that please you the most, while the adjustment of the function is set through the digital controller of the inflatable hot tub.About the salt water filtering system, it makes a robust engine, not considering specifically size, but technology.

Some manufacturers recommend the cleaning of the tubes system with an anti-clog solution. That requires you to fill in a little bit the tub with clean new water, pour the solution and turn on the jet system to make the water circulate in the whole system and let it take action for the recommended amount of time. This anti-clog cleanig must be performed with the new cartridges already set. Dump the water after the anti-clog cleaning and fill in with another portion of clean water, turn on the jets again to wash any remains of the solution.
And since you will be using the same water for a long while, all the best models come with a chemical floater dispenser which will treat the water and block the formation of algae deposits.All inflatable hot tubs come with the pump system to inflate the set, and all that is automated, so all you have to do is connect the tubes and let it inflate by itself. These hot tubs also are designed with an electrical controller to set all adjustments of water temperature, stirring and filtering for the amount of time you wish.
Part of our patio is enclosed so we thought that would be a very cool idea for the winter months. That is something you cannot do with a hard hot tub. So having our hot tub out under the stars in the summer months then, bringing it inside during the harsh weather not only protected and kept it cleaner longer, but we felt a bit like we were staying at a resort.
It has heavy-duty construction and a good selection of accessories at a very reasonable price. The Fiber-Tech construction combines reinforced laminated PVC with a layer of fibrous material. The tub measures 77 inches across and 28 inches deep; it holds 210 gallons of water and can support four adults at a time. The thermal ground cloth this inflatable spa comes with protects the bottom of the tub while adding a layer of insulation. The fitted cover has child-protected safety locks and a foil lining to help retain heat. It has a combination pump and heater that circulates water first through a built-in water softener then a water filter. This is an uncommon feature for an inflatable hot tub. Using the digital controls on the heater, you can set the temperature to anywhere between 68 and 104 degrees Fahrenheit. You also activate the 120 jets using the digital readout. The jets are powered by the same air pump you use to inflate the tub. An included air pressure gauge helps you inflate the tub to just the right level, and a specialized wrench is included to tighten the valve when needed. The tub comes with a carry bag for easy storage and portability. Other accessories include a package of three-way test strips (which test pH levels, alkalinity and free chlorine levels), a floating chlorine dispenser and two filter cartridges. Intex backs the PureSpa with a 12-month warranty, which includes both the tub and the combined pump and heater unit.
Maybe the best benefit of a saltwater hot tub is that you no longer need to store bromine or chlorine tablets. You should still shock the spa, so keep a granular oxidizer on hand, but you can use chlorine-free MPS if you prefer. Spa salt systems make their own chlorine, so it’s still a chlorinated spa. However, the chlorine is created naturally, without binders or additives. It’s pure chlorine.
It does exactly what it says on the tin. When you want to use it, you just pump it up, fill it up with water, and add your chemicals. Once you are done it is simply a case of emptying it out, letting it dry and deflating the spa. You can then leave it in storage until its next use. Most of us will fill it and use it for months! Others will take it out only on special occasions.
Size – The first thing to look into when buying an inflatable hot tub is how big it is. We aren’t necessarily talking about the overall size of the tub itself but also the number of people it can fit without causing them any discomfort. Usually, these tubs can hold anywhere between two and eight people depending on price, build type, and inbuilt features. Needless to say, the bigger the tub is the more you can expect to pay for one, not to mention how pricey the maintenance can be.
Cover: if you spot a model that includes the cover, it is a plus, however don’t take the cover of an average model as an advantage just because it has a cover. They are quite important to keep your tub not only hotter for longer but also to protect the water from getting contaminated with sitting dust and any other contaminants from the air, from leaves to insects that may be really looking for water. Most brands that don’t include the cover sell it separately.
Our only concern was that we found no inflatable hot tubs with built-in seats. Now, there is a good reason for this, mainly because you don’t need them. It is very comfortable to sit in, but a little strange at first if you are used to having seats in your hot tubs or spa. The others reason being an inflating issue. If seats were part of the tub, they might be a weak spot and susceptible to stress tears. Also, less water is needed, which is more cost effective in maintenance costs.
To empty is pretty easy, you fasten your stopper caps to the valves on the inside of the spa, this will stop the water from escaping. Now remove the pump by loosening the connectors and attach a cap to outlet A. (These caps come with hot tub) Fix the hose adapter to your garden hose and attach both to connector B, make sure that the other end of your hose is at the drain then remove the lower cap from the inside of the spa. Once it’s empty make sure you dry it properly before you pack it away.
Inflating your tub is easy, but you need to ensure that you do not end up over inflating it. Do not go overboard when doing it for the first time. Keep in mind that the factors like the direct sunlight and heat will increase the pressure. Therefore, you should not inflate it to the maximum – you can always add more air when you know it can handle more.
To empty is pretty easy, you fasten your stopper caps to the valves on the inside of the spa, this will stop the water from escaping. Now remove the pump by loosening the connectors and attach a cap to outlet A. (These caps come with hot tub) Fix the hose adapter to your garden hose and attach both to connector B, make sure that the other end of your hose is at the drain then remove the lower cap from the inside of the spa. Once it’s empty make sure you dry it properly before you pack it away.
On average, do you know how much people spend on an in-ground hot tub? It’s normally between $15,000 to $20,000. Even those of us that have good jobs aren’t able to afford that all at once – that’s a whole lot of money. When you look at an inflatable hot tub, you’re going to be shocked with the price – for a good-quality hot tub, the price will start at $300. Yes, $300 …we didn’t forget to put a “0” at the end of that.
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