When you think of a blow-up hot tub, what do you picture? Don’t picture a soft, flimsy pool toy – it’s nothing like that. If you get the opportunity to use one, you’re going to be surprised at how sturdy it is. These spas do have that “softer” feel to them and personally, we find this much better than sitting on hard plastic or concrete …it’s more relaxing.
Another important aspect that you have to take into consideration is the hot tub’s seating capacity. What we recommend you go with are tubs that can accommodate 6 people at once, like the Coleman SaluSpa or the Intex 28409E PureSpa Plus Bubble Spa. But if you know that you won’t have that many guests over and that you do not actually need a large seating capacity, it is perfectly fine to go with a model like the Canadian Spa Company CSCHTRG29 Rio Grande as well, a tub that has a seating capacity of 4 persons. All in all, just make sure that you think well about this aspect before you go shopping to not regret your decision later.
This attractive hot tub option proves you do not need to spend an arm and a leg on a hot tub just to have a great time outdoors. Made of heavy-duty lining, the hot tub is designed for durability and frequent use. Massage jets create a gentle stream of current and bubbles to help your muscles relax while keeping the water at a consistent temperature. This tub can hold around four to six people.
Outdoors: Obviously in the summer months outdoors is going to be great. If you are in a particularly hot region then, although it is tempting to leave the spa unprotected in the sun to keep water temperature up.  Be cautious of too much hot a sun, as the tub can deform with exposure to excessive prolonged heat. Setting up or putting it inside a gazebo is a perfect solution to overcome this. See our guide to the best gazebos >>
In addition to the ground mat, valve wrench and pressure gauge, the Lay-Z-Spa also comes with one filter cartridge, a chemical floater, a patch kit and an instructional DVD that covers set-up and maintenance. The warranty is less generous than other models. It covers the heater pump for one year, but only covers the inflatable tub for 90 days and the accompanying hoses and fittings for a mere 30 days.

The main issue against saltwater hot tubs is that salt causes corrosion. At levels of 2,000-3,000 ppm, there should be no worry about damage to finishes and pool equipment. There is one material in particular that doesn’t like salt, that being Buna rubber, which some pump shaft seals are made of. Again, at normal levels, there should be no concern. But if your pump seal begins to leak, we do have pump shaft seal made for high salt or ozone conditions.
Usually costing around $4,000 to $9,000 depending on type and size and location to be installed. But going the inflatable spa way will run you around $500, with no setup costs. And if you will only be using it part of the year, you simply deflate it and store it away. There are no costs of maintaining it to keep it from looking like something that the creature from the black lagoon would like to hide out in. Oh, and did we mention, to heat it up and keep it heated will run around $8-$12 a month depending on your electricity prices per kWh.
×