Like a spa, a hot tub has built-in jets to provide warmth, relaxation and a massage effect on people's muscles and joints. Both are used for therapeutic reasons and socialization. In the early days—the late 1960s and early 1970s—hot tubs were made from wood, including cedar, redwood, cypress, teak, or a composite. In the mid-1970s, the technologically advanced portable acrylic spas were introduced, replacing the wooden tubs in popularity.
Keeping the products in order, we will start with the Coleman Inflatable Tub. Most times, when you think of the Coleman brand, it brings to mind the typical camping tools and outdoors gadgets. The exterior is the classic Coleman-brand green. (This is usually their hallmark color for many of their products.) The interior is colored in a pristine, clean white and equipped with a cushioned floor that feels refreshing and soothing to the feet. Several bubble jets line the interior and serve well for water massages and bubble stimulation.
What you must not forget to do every week is to remove the filter from the hot tub and clean it. Read the user manual that the tub comes with to see where the filter is located, and clean it by simply wiping away the debris that has gathered on it with a cloth or a paper towel while holding it under running tap water. If you notice that large debris has gathered in the tub, immediately check the filter to see if any of that debris is trapped in it to avoid any damage from being done to it.
The best hot tub for you will depend on your requirements – for those looking for long term, energy efficient hot tub that’s built to last, that provides superior hydromassage and comfort – traditional hot tubs can’t be beaten. If you’d just like to try out a hot tub style experience in the short term then an inflatable hot tub might meet your needs.
Your inflatable hot tub should not be placed in an environment with temperatures less than 4ºC or 40ºF. This can cause irreversible damage to your hot tub’s pump and heater. If your inflatable hot tub is placed in your patio, backyard or lawn, it is best to transfer it to a warmer location inside your home or just pack and store it away during the winter season.
Convenience. Combination hot tubs must be heated up prior to each use. This requires more energy than portable spas, which maintain a constant ready temperature. In addition, heating up water causes a significant delay before the owner can use it. This delay can discourage regular usage, as it makes fitting a daily soak into your routine more difficult.
What makes them far superior to conventional models is the fact that they are portable. Unlike conventional tubs, the inflatable ones can be deflated in no time and moved from one spot to another with ease. This benefit comes especially in handy to those who travel a lot and who want to enjoy the experience of using the hot tub wherever they go. When you want to place it in a specific location, simply find a level ground, set it there, inflate it, and wait for the water to heat up before you start using it.
To ensure that the water inside the tub will be kept clean even when you are not using it, it comes with a leather cover and it features safety lock clips that you can use to insulate it. Additionally, setting it up is a hassle-free operation which does not require the use of tools, meaning that in a matter of minutes you will be able to start soaking in the tub and relax.
When you think of a blow-up hot tub, what do you picture? Don’t picture a soft, flimsy pool toy – it’s nothing like that. If you get the opportunity to use one, you’re going to be surprised at how sturdy it is. These spas do have that “softer” feel to them and personally, we find this much better than sitting on hard plastic or concrete …it’s more relaxing.
They don’t usually use real water jets, but instead use fans to “blow” the air around (also because of the 120 volt outlet), which causes them to cool down much faster than a regular hot tub. This cooling effect is only made worse by the fact that the materials they are made from lose heat much faster than the materials used on a regular hot tub. All in all, you aren’t likely to get more than 15 minutes to a half an hour of good heat out of an inflatable hot tub.
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