One of the best things about a portable hot tub is the fact that you don’t have to have any tools to get set up. Locate the space you want to set up in and lay down your ground mat. Open up the hot tub on top of the ground mat and using the inflation hose attached to the hot tub pump unit with the gauge attached inflate your tub until the gauge reads 1.2 then it’s filled to the right level. Don’t forget to inflate the inside of the cover, as you’ll need it when you set the heater going.
Unlike traditional spas, inflatable models do not experience many leaks or blockages of tubing. Due to the PVC material, sealing is much easier than with fibreglass and makes these issues less likely to take place. Inflatable tubs are also very simple to access for maintenance, so you will not need to cut or remove any parts of your home in order to get to the area that needs attention.

Although you will have a water maintenance program going on you will still need to change your water on a regular basis and to do this you need to be able to empty the hot tub easily. When this hot tub is filled to the line with water it holds 177 gallons, so you won’t be able to move it when it’s full. You need to make sure your hose can reach a drain from where you are placing your hot tub.
Saltwater hot tubs are still using chlorine, but it’s not your father’s chlorine! It’s pure chlorine, or hypochlorous acid, and it can’t be compared to the tablet type. I love the salt system in my spa. I’ve had it installed for nearly a year now, and other than add some replacement salt, I haven’t had to touch it. I still test the water and shock the spa weekly. But my water balance is more steady, and the water feels and smells great! The best part? There’s no corrosion damage!
An inflatable hot tub is made of several layers of thick, strong and solid vinyl rubber. The rubber becomes inflexible when completely inflated; thus, providing genuine and reliable protection. The materials used in the manufacture of inflatable hot tubs are tough, sturdy and long-lasting. You can expect it to withstand rowdy water play, jabs, appalling weather, and the accumulation of debris.
Who does not enjoy a good dip into a hot tub? Letting the warm, flowing water massage and relax your muscles is a great way to wind down after a long day. And while a permanent (or "hard side") hot tub has its advantages, not everyone has the right space for one or wants to dedicate valuable deck or patio square footage to a built in unit. This is where an inflatable hot tub has the advantage. They offer a lot of the same features as permanent hot tubs but are much more affordable and can be set up and taken down as your usage dictates. With their many different sizes and shapes, it is easy to find the right tub to fit in your yard or patio space. Some even come with more luxury features, such as massage jets, so you aren’t missing out on anything the more expensive options offer.Here’s a look at the top seven inflatable hot tubs you should check out for the next time you need to relax outside.
Usually costing around $4,000 to $9,000 depending on type and size and location to be installed. But going the inflatable spa way will run you around $500, with no setup costs. And if you will only be using it part of the year, you simply deflate it and store it away. There are no costs of maintaining it to keep it from looking like something that the creature from the black lagoon would like to hide out in. Oh, and did we mention, to heat it up and keep it heated will run around $8-$12 a month depending on your electricity prices per kWh.
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