When you get the AirJet Spa, you can easily set it up by yourself without using any tools. You will just have to fill up the tub, connect it to mains, fill it up to whatever level you want with water, turn the heater ON and enjoy. So now that you know how simple it is to set up the tub, you should also know that even the tub is small, the company states that the tub is capable of up to 4 persons but I recommend you to get only 2 persons in because it isn’t a swimming pool after all.

Because a plug and play hot tub is not hard wired into a permanent outside gfci box it makes it easier to take with you if you ever move. Or if your a renter you can have a hot tub and take it with you when you buy a house or rent another one! Generally plug and play spas are smaller and lighter making them much more portable and easy move, but not having to worry about installing another 220v electrical service at your next home makes the move easier as well.
On the other hand, inflatable tubs are easier to set up and handle than regular hot tubs. For starters, they are portable, and you can put them up anywhere you like. You can have it on your balcony, in your sitting room in front of the TV, and even go out and have it somewhere outside. The name inflatable suggests you can carry it to a location of your choice, blow it up and voilà you have a hot tub anywhere you like. It gives you freedom of setup which you don’t get from a regular hot tub as you cannot move the later from one place to another.
A built-in hot tub is really heavy – and it is built-in. You cannot carry it around. It is more or less a permanent fixture in your home. If you want to move it, you will have to spend several days just disassembling it. You will have to hire an electrician and plumber to help you with the more technical aspects involved in installing or disassembling a traditional hot tub.
The Lay-Z-Spa comes with a fitted top cover, made of the same green faux-leather material that covers the outside of the tub. A foil lining helps the top cover to better retain heat, and an inflatable disc sits atop the tub, underneath the fitted cover. Around the outside of the tub you’ll find several clips to secure the cover, as well as built-in handles for repositioning the inflated tub before filling it with water.
The focused jet of water under high pressure makes a unique massage experience therefore water jets can give you a much stronger and more direct massage than air jets. The water pump is less noisy than it’s air counterpart. No heat losses due to cold air being pushed into the water. Together with hot water, they are awesome for relieving sore muscles – check out this study.
The design and structure of the tub is just as important as the materials used to make it. Many manufacturers use a segmented inflatable design, reinforced with a vertical I-beam structure inside. These internal vinyl panels make for a sturdier tub, one that can support users leaning against it or even sitting directly on the outer wall of the spa. Premium portable hot tubs add another level of stability and protection with interlocking panels that surround the inflatable tub. Made of waterproof composite materials, these panels provide a rigid wall that protects and insulates the hot tub.
Most of the inflatable hot tubs have air jets. They are cheaper to manufacture and provide affordable but amazing massage. How come they are so cheap? Well, they reuse the same blower that inflates your spa when setting it up for pushing the air through a hose into a ring on the floor with holes in it. While this doesn’t sound very sophisticated, the massage and tinkling feeling on your skin is actually very pleasant.
The first thing that comes to mind when you think about a hot tub is luxury. While it is true that hard-side models come at inaccessible prices for most, the same cannot be said about inflating tubs. Inflatables provide all the benefits of traditional hot tubs, but they come with their own set of advantages, the most important being the fact that they are cheaper. To learn more about these amazing additions that you can make to your home, read the following lines.
Least expensive type. Inflatable hot tubs are less costly than other types. Some go for as little as $350, though the largest and most elaborate versions can cost nearly as much as some budget above-ground models, such as the Lifesmart Bermuda. Installation is also not much of a consideration, since an inflatable spa can be set up on almost any level surface. User reviews indicate that inflatable models tend to lose heat during use, which can limit their energy efficiency.
While an inflatable hot tub might offer reasonable thermal protection there is one other aspect common to most that will affect water temperature. The air used to power the bubble jets comes from outside. So if the ambient air temperature outside is 50 degrees F, then you are pumping in 50-degree air and passing it through the water. This will cool the hot tub water down relatively quickly. How quickly depends on the outside temperature but a rough guide would be 20 - 30 minutes of bubbles before the temperature drops to the point where it requires heating.
Convenience. Combination hot tubs must be heated up prior to each use. This requires more energy than portable spas, which maintain a constant ready temperature. In addition, heating up water causes a significant delay before the owner can use it. This delay can discourage regular usage, as it makes fitting a daily soak into your routine more difficult.

Consumers will also notice that the premium jets are not available in an inflatable hot tub, but are always available in portable hot tubs. Inflatable hot tubs can simulate the jets, but does not provide nearly the same massage quality as the real thing. The last thing to point out is the control panel, which will be a toss-up depending on who you go with. Most makers put the control panel in place so that you don’t have to leave the hot tub to use it. In an inflatable hot tub there are less functions to play with so it inspires the plug and play attitude. So if you’re looking for ease of use, then inflatable hot tubs wins in this department.
Have you been wondering whether you should invest in a portable hot tub with water jets? We’ve been looking at the SaluSpa Hawaii HydroJet which offers water jets as well as bubble jets so you can get the best of both worlds. We thought we would give you an overview of this hot tub and give you a list of pros and cons so that you can decide whether it might be the best portable hot tub for you. Read our full product review here.
They don’t usually use real water jets, but instead use fans to “blow” the air around (also because of the 120 volt outlet), which causes them to cool down much faster than a regular hot tub. This cooling effect is only made worse by the fact that the materials they are made from lose heat much faster than the materials used on a regular hot tub. All in all, you aren’t likely to get more than 15 minutes to a half an hour of good heat out of an inflatable hot tub.
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