Similar to Bestway’s Lay-Z Inflatable Hot Tub, this version also benefits from fabric coated materials and a pool cover with an aluminum foal coating to keep water extra warm at all times. Not only that but it also features a Lay-Z Massage system, a rapid heating system, and an integrated water filtration feature to keep things nice and clean. Furthermore, the tub features a mosaic print pool liner with a cushioned floor and a convenient drain valve.


This tub is made of six-layer laminated PVC material called Rhino-Tech. It has vertical interior vinyl panels to give it support and prevent sagging over time. It comes with a carrying case and only weighs 66 pounds, making it quite portable before you inflate it. The Alpine M-009LS’s combined pump and heater unit is built into the tub wall, unlike most inflatable hot tubs that have external heating systems. The digital control panel extends out from the side of the pool so it’s within easy reach. The heater raises the temperature up to 104 degrees Fahrenheit, but it raises the temperature 2 to 3 degrees per hour, so you’ll have to start heating the day before use. As with other tubs, the integrated air blower doubles as an inflator and the power behind the 120 bubble jets. It comes with a pressure gauge to avoid over-inflation. It also comes with a protective ground mat that is just a little larger than the tub’s footprint, but it’s not cushioned as mats on other tubs are. This inflatable spa comes with two filter cartridges which attach to the inside of the tub. It also comes with a garden hose adapter for the drainage spout, making it easier to empty the tub. The Alpine M-009LS has a fitted top cover with a foil lining to retain heat. The cover is secured with locking straps, but instead of being integrated into the tub, as some tubs are designed, it latched to the ground mat.
To empty it, you’ll attach a hose to your hot tub drain valve and let the water run out. Expect this to take a little time. Remember to only drain the water into a sanitary sewer, never a storm drain or natural body of water, such as a creek. The chemicals and contaminants in your spa water can kill plants and fish, and can get into the drinking water supply.
Apart from the filters and chemicals one should employ to ensure the long-term durability of their inflatable hot tub, you aren’t likely to need any other tools or accessory. Even so, make sure to give it the attention it deserves in regards to cleaning and maintenance. You should also remember to deflate it fully when storing it to avoid any complications. In fact, you can always give the tub a good scrub after you’ve deflated it, just so it will be clear of any impurities that might otherwise damage the tub in the long run.
Different inflatable tub model will have a different mode of installation so make sure to read the manual prior to assembling the unit. Also make sure to watch installation DVD if included or watch YouTube videos of other customers who have successfully installed their own inflatable hot tubs. If still uncertain and have more questions, you can always call your inflatable hot tub’s customer service hotline.

Also called ‘fixed,’ ‘traditional,’ and even built-in tubs, regular hot tubs miss the big feature of portability. Portable or movable tubs work for everyone irrespective of how much space you have in your home. You can easily set it up with ease, and in case of an inflatable hot tub, you can store it with utmost ease without wasting any precious real estate.


The maintenance of inflatable hot tubs should be a breeze, right? Keep the filters in good condition by removing and rinsing them every few days or so, depending on how much it has been used. Another downside is the location filters. Some models place the filters inside the heater or pump for easy access, while others put it along the bottom inner portion of the tub. This makes cleaning and changing it a more demanding task.

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For most of us, the desire to have your own inflatable hot tub comes when the temperature begins to drop and the weather becomes colder. You long for the times when you could easily lounge in a Jacuzzi at your favorite spa salon. But often, the cost for professional spa treatments can add up over time prompting you to just stay indoors and cozy up next to your heater instead. However, those days are long gone. A practical option available for you now is to purchase your own inflatable portable hot tub.
Because a plug and play hot tub is not hard wired into a permanent outside gfci box it makes it easier to take with you if you ever move. Or if your a renter you can have a hot tub and take it with you when you buy a house or rent another one! Generally plug and play spas are smaller and lighter making them much more portable and easy move, but not having to worry about installing another 220v electrical service at your next home makes the move easier as well.
Coleman Lay Z Spa is a great entry-level inflatable spa. If this is your first time, this is the inflatable hot tub model that we confidently recommend. It is one of the cheapest hot tubs under 500 that continues to be a crowd favorite. It is so easy to set up and the materials used are very durable as well. In fact, you can even sit on the sides without deflating it or affecting the shape.
In a worst case scenario the part that blows up the inflatable hot tub can malfunction, meaning that you’re left with a deflated piece of strong plastic. Portable hot tubs provide a great sense of security in that their main parts are the control panel and the heating element, which are all built into the tub itself. With inflatable hot tubs having a separate heater/blower, it takes something as simple as a person forgetting to pack it or that piece short circuiting to ruin everyone’s fun.
Like many people I know, my first experience with an in-ground hot tub was in a nice hotel on a vacation. I didn’t really know anyone who had these things at home since they’re as expensive as cars and that’s not even counting the operational and maintenance costs. They need a good deal of space too. It wasn’t until a friend bought an inflatable hot tub that I realized how such delights are possible for ordinary people like me. Many inflatable hot tub reviews show that inflatable hot tubs are less durable but now the material of inflatable hot tub changed a lot. Now they are more durable than ever.
Hot tubs also offer several different designs and styles of seats. Some hot tubs have ergonomic seats that can fit the height and build of each person. It is useful in targeting specific areas of the body that needs to be massaged. Today, it can be made in both indoors and outdoors, both fixed and portable due to new high-quality laminate materials.
Usually costing around $4,000 to $9,000 depending on type and size and location to be installed. But going the inflatable spa way will run you around $500, with no setup costs. And if you will only be using it part of the year, you simply deflate it and store it away. There are no costs of maintaining it to keep it from looking like something that the creature from the black lagoon would like to hide out in. Oh, and did we mention, to heat it up and keep it heated will run around $8-$12 a month depending on your electricity prices per kWh.
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