When looking for an inflatable hot tub I would be surprised if you haven’t heard about the Coleman Saluspa(Lay Z Spa)Hot Tub which are one of the most popular choices that customers have made. If you’re serious about buying a hot tub you’ll probably be reading as many reviews as you can to get as well informed as you can. We thought we’d go over what customers are saying and give a list of pros and cons to help you out.
In-ground or custom styles are usually referred to as spas. They can be attached or adjacent to an in-ground swimming pool and are often placed near each other as a warm water and cold plunge-type of therapeutic experience. Others are stand-alone hot tubs, but set into the ground or custom built. Some are sturdy portable models (not inflatable) from top manufacturers that are installed to look like they are custom-built in-ground models that can be positioned upon a raised platform, sometimes under a pergola or a gazebo. Others actually are custom built and constructed of the same materials that pools are made of, like concrete, fiberglass, or gunite, along with stainless steel, tile, or copper.
Inflatable hot tubs consume a lot of water, up to 250 gallons (almost 1000 L) so people will not be happy changing it every week as the water bill will become quite salty. On the other hand, the same water can’t be used forever, so soon or later you will have to replace it, but it all will depend on how often the inflatable hot tub is used and how well you treat the water.
Unlike traditional spas, inflatable models do not experience many leaks or blockages of tubing. Due to the PVC material, sealing is much easier than with fibreglass and makes these issues less likely to take place. Inflatable tubs are also very simple to access for maintenance, so you will not need to cut or remove any parts of your home in order to get to the area that needs attention.
Also called ‘fixed,’ ‘traditional,’ and even built-in tubs, regular hot tubs miss the big feature of portability. Portable or movable tubs work for everyone irrespective of how much space you have in your home. You can easily set it up with ease, and in case of an inflatable hot tub, you can store it with utmost ease without wasting any precious real estate.

The jet heads here are called HydroJets and as we said, have a duo functionality. There are eight big heads that can also be adjusted by hand to the direction that please you the most, while the adjustment of the function is set through the digital controller of the inflatable hot tub.About the salt water filtering system, it makes a robust engine, not considering specifically size, but technology.

Portability: another great benefit of the inflatable hot tubs is the portability. Since you can inflate and deflate it, the set is very easily assembled anywhere. Some models can endure cold weather so you will be able to use it even during the fall and winter seasons, while installing a traditional hot tub in the open is a scenario unlike to many of those models and often has a higher cost. Most of the inflatable hot tubs also have a thermal insulating cover for that kind of use, so even during summer nights when you need to leave the tub for a while, you can cover it and keep it warm for longer.

Usually costing around $4,000 to $9,000 depending on type and size and location to be installed. But going the inflatable spa way will run you around $500, with no setup costs. And if you will only be using it part of the year, you simply deflate it and store it away. There are no costs of maintaining it to keep it from looking like something that the creature from the black lagoon would like to hide out in. Oh, and did we mention, to heat it up and keep it heated will run around $8-$12 a month depending on your electricity prices per kWh.
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