It isn’t designed to be left running 24/7, and will automatically shut off after around 48hrs. If you intend to make regular use of a hot tub and don’t want to have to keep waiting for the water to get back up to temperature, then a portable hot tub may not be the be the most efficient choice. If, however, you are simply looking for something to enhance your weekends, a portable spa is definitely the answer,
Outdoors: Obviously in the summer months outdoors is going to be great. If you are in a particularly hot region then, although it is tempting to leave the spa unprotected in the sun to keep water temperature up.  Be cautious of too much hot a sun, as the tub can deform with exposure to excessive prolonged heat. Setting up or putting it inside a gazebo is a perfect solution to overcome this. See our guide to the best gazebos >>
Maybe the best benefit of a saltwater hot tub is that you no longer need to store bromine or chlorine tablets. You should still shock the spa, so keep a granular oxidizer on hand, but you can use chlorine-free MPS if you prefer. Spa salt systems make their own chlorine, so it’s still a chlorinated spa. However, the chlorine is created naturally, without binders or additives. It’s pure chlorine.
If your looking how to order, there are several companies selling a huge range, so it can be difficult to choose the right one. Ask yourself how often you will be using the Jacuzzi, how many people should it seat, where is it going to go? Check out the online comments and do your research as although a cheap inflatable spa sounds great you will still want the top quality you can afford.
To empty it, you’ll attach a hose to your hot tub drain valve and let the water run out. Expect this to take a little time. Remember to only drain the water into a sanitary sewer, never a storm drain or natural body of water, such as a creek. The chemicals and contaminants in your spa water can kill plants and fish, and can get into the drinking water supply.
Once the set is fully inflated, you have to fill it in on your own, making use of a garden hose for example. When the tub is ready to use, you can adjust how much hot you want the water to be and for how long you want it to keep heating. The same goes for the jet heads functioning, all can be adjusted and timed by digital controlling. The main difference between the system of an inflatable and a traditional hot tub is the disposition of the motor/engine that filters, heats and blows water and air. On traditional tubs it will be placed built-in, while on the inflatable one it is a sided appliance.

To help get a more accurate idea of how big the average inflatable hot tub is, firstly take a close look at the product image, make sure you like the look of what you see. Next you should closely consider the dimensions and the fact that what makes an inflatable spa well insulated are the thick walls of trapped air. These walls are on average around 10 inches thick.
The inflatable hot tub can heat up to 104 degrees Fahrenheit, and you can adjust settings via the attached LCD touchscreen. The tub includes a cover that can help maintain the water’s temperature and keep it free from unwanted debris. The inflatable hot tub is easy to set up and doesn’t take long to inflate. The Soho spa is made primarily of vinyl, with fabric, PVC and PU leather. It ships with a one-year warranty.

This plug and play inflatable spa has one of the easiest setups possible, demanding that you spend just a few minutes during the process. At the same time, it requires no plumbing whatsoever, mostly due to its ingenious thermal systems. Speaking of which, the tub has solid-state thermic controls which enable you to control the temperature of the water in great detail along with the tub’s many other features.


This is the best $360 we've ever spent. We use it once or twice a day since we got it 2 months ago. So... it took about 15 hours to heat up to 104 degrees to start things off. To save money on electricity we turn it off after our last use for the day,,, around 5pm,, leaving only the water circulating on. Then when we get up 5/6am we turn the heater back on and it's ready to go at 104 degrees around 3pm that afternoon. Since I've never had a spa or pool before that I had to maintain chemical balances, that was a little confusing until we educated ourselves. There is an automatic run time clock on the unit but I've never taken the time to learn how to use it. Assembly,,, was easy but I wish I had a video to watch (I learned a lot ... full review
The pump and the hot tub are easy to connect together but you need it to be simple to use while you are in the tub. All the controls are press button, and they are set in a circular style display with a led display in the centre. From the top left there is an auto-lock button which activates in 5 minutes, to release press for 3 seconds. Next is the timer button so you can decide when you want the heater to come on and you can also set the temperature. You have a filter button to turn the filter on and off, a light shows when it is on, you have the option to display the heat in Celsius or Fahrenheit and then there is a heater button to start the heating function, the temperature can be adjusted with the arrow buttons but most people heat it to the maximum 104F. Finally you have the bubble massage button which when pressed automatically turns off the heater. All of these buttons can be accessed from when you are seated in the tub.
Materials: While most models make use of the same kind of fabric formula, you must check carefully how the fabric works for the set. How many layers? Does it work with a chamber system? It is water proof? Easy to clean? The outer fabric is soft or rigid? The materials used for the inner part and the outer part are often quite different and you have to be likewise careful to do not pick models that have a way too soft plastic for the pool/inner part.

It is a reasonably good portable hot tub for people looking for a capacity of 4-6 persons.  When inflated, it has an overall width of 77 inches, which is usually enough to accommodate a tall person. It has a sophisticated digital control panel that ensures automatic start/stop mechanism. There is a LED light as well that show different cycles through 7 colors.
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Unlike certain recreational water gadgets, you can maintain an inflatable tub easily. It’s not complicated as all you need to do is keep the water at a specific pH and clean out the filters regularly. It’s also a great consolation that the filtration system comes attached to the tub so that you don’t have to set it up or mess with it in any way. Just clean the filters often, and it will work perfectly.

Usually costing around $4,000 to $9,000 depending on type and size and location to be installed. But going the inflatable spa way will run you around $500, with no setup costs. And if you will only be using it part of the year, you simply deflate it and store it away. There are no costs of maintaining it to keep it from looking like something that the creature from the black lagoon would like to hide out in. Oh, and did we mention, to heat it up and keep it heated will run around $8-$12 a month depending on your electricity prices per kWh.
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