One of the major perks of having your own portable hot tub is its mobility and easy installation. Unlike the regular ones, having an inflatable spa does not consume a permanent space because you can easily wrap it up and set aside. You can have it stored out in your backyard on a sunny day, or pack it up and take it inside during winter. And how can we forget taking this fun little amusement on vacations and weekend getaways? I mean, blow-up hot tubs can really be your best friend.
One more reason why some individuals buy blow up options rather than ordinary styles is cost. They're usually a lot more reasonably priced, even though the cost can differ depending upon the unit. One of the greatest drawbacks of an blow up hot tub is its dimensions. It can hardly ever support as many people as an ordinary option, so it is much less suitable for use while entertaining your friends and family.
The maintenance of inflatable hot tubs should be a breeze, right? Keep the filters in good condition by removing and rinsing them every few days or so, depending on how much it has been used. Another downside is the location filters. Some models place the filters inside the heater or pump for easy access, while others put it along the bottom inner portion of the tub. This makes cleaning and changing it a more demanding task.

First and foremost, you have to look for a model that has a quality construction. The durable construction is going to ensure that it will be a lasting investment, meaning that you won’t have to replace it for a long time. What we recommend is a tub like our top choice, the SaluSpa Hawaii HydroJet Pro that features polyester laminated PVC for the construction of the tub. Also, to figure out whether you are looking at a top quality model or not, you should search for the I-Beam technology feature as well because it shows increased stability, safety, and durability.
Thanks to its low-profile design, this particular tub can be set up in just a matter of minutes. This being said, you will be surprised to find out that it can accommodate up to four adults at the same time despite its apparently lightweight construction. As far as features go, this inflatable hot tub comes with a Lay-Z massage system, both rapid-heating and water-filtration systems, and an easy to operate digital control panel to top it off. Overall, it is perhaps one of the most cost-effective inflatable hot tubs money can buy.
The tub is made to comfortably seat four to six adults, and a cushioned ground mat adds to the comfort. If you don't need such a spacious hot tub, consider the Intex PureSpa 77 Bubble 28403E. The ground cloth not only protects the hot tub from dirt and debris, it also puts an extra layer of cushioning between the people in the tub and the ground underneath.
People who have back problems report a decrease in back pain after a few minutes soak in their own inflatable hot tubs. The water in the hot tub and the jet bubbles produced helps massage and relax your back muscles. Your whole body will also feel more rejuvenated after each soak. The perfect time to go for a hot tub soak is after a hard day’s work.
It features a soothing AirJet system that ensures ultimate comfort when using it, the bubbly massage relieving any pain you feel. It can heat up the water to a maximum of 104 degrees Fahrenheit, and it does so in record time. Best of all, the time-controlled heating system ensures a convenient operation as it automatically starts and stops as needed to preserve the temperature you select.
Chlorine tablets smell bad in the bucket and bad in the spa. Bromine is a little bit better, but I can still smell it on my skin and on my hair hours after soaking. Have you ever opened up your spa cover and detected the strong smell of chlorine?  That’s the smell of combined molecules, either chloramines or bromamines. Salt systems are much less likely to produce these foul smelling mutations of chlorine, because after a chlorine molecule is used up, it reverts back to salt, a.k.a. sodium chloride!
Least expensive type. Inflatable hot tubs are less costly than other types. Some go for as little as $350, though the largest and most elaborate versions can cost nearly as much as some budget above-ground models, such as the Lifesmart Bermuda. Installation is also not much of a consideration, since an inflatable spa can be set up on almost any level surface. User reviews indicate that inflatable models tend to lose heat during use, which can limit their energy efficiency.
Because a plug and play hot tub is not hard wired into a permanent outside gfci box it makes it easier to take with you if you ever move. Or if your a renter you can have a hot tub and take it with you when you buy a house or rent another one! Generally plug and play spas are smaller and lighter making them much more portable and easy move, but not having to worry about installing another 220v electrical service at your next home makes the move easier as well.

Regardless, they do get the job done of relaxing you in a very luxurious way. Bubble Jets are installed at the bottom perimeter of the tub, to give you a soothing light massage. The water heater can raise the water’s temperature at a rate of 2 to 3 degrees per hour. There is also a built-in water filtration system to help maintain the water’s cleanliness.
Usually costing around $4,000 to $9,000 depending on type and size and location to be installed. But going the inflatable spa way will run you around $500, with no setup costs. And if you will only be using it part of the year, you simply deflate it and store it away. There are no costs of maintaining it to keep it from looking like something that the creature from the black lagoon would like to hide out in. Oh, and did we mention, to heat it up and keep it heated will run around $8-$12 a month depending on your electricity prices per kWh.
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