One more reason why some individuals buy blow up options rather than ordinary styles is cost. They're usually a lot more reasonably priced, even though the cost can differ depending upon the unit. One of the greatest drawbacks of an blow up hot tub is its dimensions. It can hardly ever support as many people as an ordinary option, so it is much less suitable for use while entertaining your friends and family.
Of the 3 main inflatable hot tub brands, this hot tub is the largest and has the most bubble jets (140). With an 85-inch diameter and 290 gallon capacity, this Intex model provides more personal relaxation space than any other. More room means it is easier to stretch out and easier to sink down so that bubbling water is lapping around your shoulders. That said we think 4 people is the comfortable max.
The design of an inflatable hot tub is simple. It consists of an inflatable tub made of PVC or vinyl, as well as an external combination pump and heater unit that controls both water temperature and jets. Inflatable hot tubs can generally be set up in 15 or 20 minutes and filled from a garden hose. Most of them can heat water up to comfortably hot temperatures overnight. Even though the basics are the same across the models listed here, there are some key factors to consider in your buying decision.

Inflating your tub is easy, but you need to ensure that you do not end up over inflating it. Do not go overboard when doing it for the first time. Keep in mind that the factors like the direct sunlight and heat will increase the pressure. Therefore, you should not inflate it to the maximum – you can always add more air when you know it can handle more.
Slow To Heat – These have electric heaters and not gas like the in ground or acrylic may have. The rule of thumb is to expect about one hour wait time for every 2 to 3 degree rise in temperature. So if you don’t plan to keep it on all week, start heating it up Saturday morning or Friday night for the weekend. But this is also a money saver since these spas need much less water and have awesome insulation you could keep it heated at all times for pennies more. Or be a diligent saver and only heat it up when you know you want to use it. Just give yourself some head-start time.
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Most of the inflatable hot tubs have air jets. They are cheaper to manufacture and provide affordable but amazing massage. How come they are so cheap? Well, they reuse the same blower that inflates your spa when setting it up for pushing the air through a hose into a ring on the floor with holes in it. While this doesn’t sound very sophisticated, the massage and tinkling feeling on your skin is actually very pleasant.
Heating the water up – One must keep in mind that a hot tub can take several hours to heat up depending on its construction and the technologies it employs. Please consider that the bigger the tub is the more it would take for the water inside it to heat up to the desired temperature. Furthermore, black hot tubs kept outdoors will likely draw more sunlight, thus causing the water they contain to heat up much faster.
Easy to install, but a few quirks. An inflatable hot tub is the easiest kind to set up and install. When deflated, you can carry it anywhere, then simply inflate it, fill it up and plug it in. However, the water may take a while to come up to temperature (days, in fact, some reviewers say) and may lose heat rapidly during use. That's because inflatable tubs generally use air jets in place of hot-water jets, and the airflow cools the water. Some users also complain that the air blowers are noisy. Unlike other hot tubs, however, this type is truly portable. You can even take it with you on vacation, but the hassle of emptying and refilling the spa may be a consideration.
The Bestway Miami is 71 inches in diameter, making it one of the smallest. Fitting 4 adults in this hot tub is a squeeze. You may have noticed by now that most inflatable spas in reality cannot comfortably cope with the number of people recommended by the manufacturer. They are never as big as they are made out to be! The Bestway Miami is no exception here, with our recommendation being 2 people comfortably and 3 max.
Bathing is that sacrosanct activity that has historically been known to be much more than just cleaning oneself. The hygiene part aside, most people have confirmed that bathing is that time of the day when the mind feels relaxed and you get a lot of thinking done. Solutions to important problems and strategies to enhance your activities are most likely to present themselves to you at such relaxed junctures. So when you engage in such an important activity, it is important to use the right methods. Here are a list of pros and cons of bathing in inflatable hot tubs.

The Bestway SaluSpa Siena AirJet Tub shrinks everything enjoyable about a normal hot tub down into a two-person size. With the smaller profile comes an individualized hot tub experience that features personal water jets, contoured seating and an automatic start-and-stop timer. The shape of the tub is long and narrow, making it easy to fit in smaller spaces and between furniture and other obstacles.
One of the common gripes about these spa’s is the fact that when you use the bubble massage system you can’t use the heater at the same time. The bubbles have a 30 minute auto shut off and in that time the temperature can drop a few degrees. The bubbles going through the water can make it feel a bit cooler too. To be fair this is an issue with most portable hot tubs with bubble jets. It’s easy to switch the heater back on as soon as the bubbles are finished but the temperature only rises a few degrees an hour.
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Usually costing around $4,000 to $9,000 depending on type and size and location to be installed. But going the inflatable spa way will run you around $500, with no setup costs. And if you will only be using it part of the year, you simply deflate it and store it away. There are no costs of maintaining it to keep it from looking like something that the creature from the black lagoon would like to hide out in. Oh, and did we mention, to heat it up and keep it heated will run around $8-$12 a month depending on your electricity prices per kWh.
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