This is the best $360 we've ever spent. We use it once or twice a day since we got it 2 months ago. So... it took about 15 hours to heat up to 104 degrees to start things off. To save money on electricity we turn it off after our last use for the day,,, around 5pm,, leaving only the water circulating on. Then when we get up 5/6am we turn the heater back on and it's ready to go at 104 degrees around 3pm that afternoon. Since I've never had a spa or pool before that I had to maintain chemical balances, that was a little confusing until we educated ourselves. There is an automatic run time clock on the unit but I've never taken the time to learn how to use it. Assembly,,, was easy but I wish I had a video to watch (I learned a lot ... full review
Keeping your inflatable hot tub at 102°, if your weather is 65° should only use about 4 kWh per day if it is used every day. So a scenario of $0.08 per kWh for 4 hours a day should be under $10 a month. A stationary hard hot tub costs much more to run and maintain which can cost anywhere between $38 to $80 per month depending on use, weather and insulation.
And this is the biggest misunderstanding between the two. There is a huge debate on the durability of inflatable hot tubs, but the fact of the matter is that they are now built with materials that make them as dependable as portable hot tubs. The reason inflatable hot tubs had to improve on their design is because they are moved twice as much as portable hot tubs.
If you do like to move it around regularly, which is the strongest advantage for inflatable hot tubs, you have to deal with draining, deflating, moving, inflating, and refilling your tub every time you want to move it. The deflating and inflating isn’t as big of a deal if you have an air compressor to hook up to it, or if your hot tub came with its own, but it still takes a while (and a good deal of water) to refill that hot tub every time, and longer yet to get the water hot.
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