While an inflatable hot tub might offer reasonable thermal protection there is one other aspect common to most that will affect water temperature. The air used to power the bubble jets comes from outside. So if the ambient air temperature outside is 50 degrees F, then you are pumping in 50-degree air and passing it through the water. This will cool the hot tub water down relatively quickly. How quickly depends on the outside temperature but a rough guide would be 20 - 30 minutes of bubbles before the temperature drops to the point where it requires heating.
To empty it, you’ll attach a hose to your hot tub drain valve and let the water run out. Expect this to take a little time. Remember to only drain the water into a sanitary sewer, never a storm drain or natural body of water, such as a creek. The chemicals and contaminants in your spa water can kill plants and fish, and can get into the drinking water supply.

The pump has an air blower, which provides air for the tub’s 120 bubble jets. The air blower can also be used to inflate the tub during setup, and it includes a pressure gauge to help you avoid overinflating the tub. The valves built into the tub should let you inflate it easily, and they prevent air from escaping when you disconnect the hose. A specialized tightening wrench is included in the package, which lets you tighten the valve setting to prevent growing leaks over time.
Most of an inflatable hot tub system is automated, except for the water filling the set up of the tub pool. You have to find a special place where the tub can stay even on the floor, preferentially with a thermal insulating material, like wood surfaces or even on your lawn. To guarantee it will be well insulated, there is a floor cover that is included in the pack and must be laid before you set the tub parts to be inflated.All the inflation process happens through and automated pump. You just need to connect the tubes and turn it on. Often the inflatable hot tub is made of two parts: the bottom/outer part and the inner/pool side of the set. They both inflate at the same time but are just assembled together with a zipper or other kind of tying system – and this is really great for insulation and safety reasons.

Not everyone can afford to have a hard hot tub built inside their homes or in patios. Built-in best hot tubs can cost upwards $2,000. An inflatable hot tub is an affordable alternative while still experiencing the same features that a regular hot tub can do. Having your own inflatable hot tub also means you will spend lesser time at the local spa. Your money spent on hot tub baths is better spent on your own inflatable hot tub setup which you can use anytime.
Like most of the portable hot tubs that are available to buy you can’t usually use the heater and the bubbles or the jets at the same time. The bubbles have a 30 minutes run time and the jets have a 60 minute run time and in that time the temperature of the water can drop a few degrees because of the cold air bubbling through the water. There’s less heat loss with the water jets. The heater can be switched back on straight afterwards.
Maybe it’s most annoying feature is that it seems to shut off automatically after 72 hours. So you have to reset it every few days. But other than that, it’s fine. It offers the very basic service of an inflatable hot tub, and you get the soothing bubbles as a bonus. The comparatively fast heating system is also a treat, especially with a tub this cheap. It’s one of the best inflatable hot tub models you can get at this price range.
Once you have the water in you’re ready to heat it up. The digital control panel included with the Coleman Saluspa is easy to use with an automatic start/stop timer-controlled heating system. With a single press of the button to unlock the controls press the heat button to start the heating process press the arrow button to set the temperature required. Place the cover over the tub as that will keep the heat in.

Portable spas used outside tend to lose heat quicker than those inside, while you would also use less power if you used it every day. The initial heating up of the water takes some time and pushed up your heating cost, whereas the more often you use it, the more the water temperature stays the same as you would only be increasing heat when the water cools down.


As expected, they come with a wide variety of health benefits as well. The most important health benefit of all is definitely the fact that using this type of tub helps improve blood circulation. The hydro massage that it offers and the hot water in which you will soak is going to cause the body temperature to rise. In return, your blood vessels will dilate and blood circulation will go a lot smoother. The people who benefit the most from this advantage are those who suffer from arthritis, providing them with better movement and less pain in the joints.
Usually costing around $4,000 to $9,000 depending on type and size and location to be installed. But going the inflatable spa way will run you around $500, with no setup costs. And if you will only be using it part of the year, you simply deflate it and store it away. There are no costs of maintaining it to keep it from looking like something that the creature from the black lagoon would like to hide out in. Oh, and did we mention, to heat it up and keep it heated will run around $8-$12 a month depending on your electricity prices per kWh.
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