The first thing that comes to mind when you think about a hot tub is luxury. While it is true that hard-side models come at inaccessible prices for most, the same cannot be said about inflating tubs. Inflatables provide all the benefits of traditional hot tubs, but they come with their own set of advantages, the most important being the fact that they are cheaper. To learn more about these amazing additions that you can make to your home, read the following lines.

That's what these inflatable hot tubs offer you. They come to you deflated, almost mysterious in their packaging. You unwrap and inflate them anywhere you have electricity. Fill them with pure water and turn them on. The electrical current warms up a heating element kept in a separate filtration compartment through which the water gradually circulates.

Least expensive type. Inflatable hot tubs are less costly than other types. Some go for as little as $350, though the largest and most elaborate versions can cost nearly as much as some budget above-ground models, such as the Lifesmart Bermuda. Installation is also not much of a consideration, since an inflatable spa can be set up on almost any level surface. User reviews indicate that inflatable models tend to lose heat during use, which can limit their energy efficiency.
A big thing to think about when shopping for a new hot tub is the costs of installation, primarily the electrical hook up. A 220v 50amp service that is required on some bigger hot tubs can range from $500-$2,000 depending on different variables. This is especially true in a lot of older homes that do not have a 200amp service and need to run an entirely new electrical service to make room for the hot tub. We see this every year with some of the older Massachusetts and New Hampshire homes.

Basically, there are two types of hot tubs and spas: portable and custom-built or in-ground. Portable models can accommodate anywhere from two to eight or more adults. They can be inflatable latex or vinyl, which are usually less expensive; fiberglass; acrylic; polyethylene; or another type of plastic. Some hot tubs are built in traditional wood or even out of recycled materials, like metal bins or barrels.
The walls are made with six-layer reinforced PVC designed to resist tears and leaking, and the inside supports 108 relaxing air jets for soothing hydrotherapy and pain relief. The spa also features a built-in heater for more convenient design, and features an LED control panel close at hand that makes it easy to activate the jets or manage the temperature inside the spa.
Usually costing around $4,000 to $9,000 depending on type and size and location to be installed. But going the inflatable spa way will run you around $500, with no setup costs. And if you will only be using it part of the year, you simply deflate it and store it away. There are no costs of maintaining it to keep it from looking like something that the creature from the black lagoon would like to hide out in. Oh, and did we mention, to heat it up and keep it heated will run around $8-$12 a month depending on your electricity prices per kWh.
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