You can use inflatable hot tubs both indoors and outdoors, but whatever you decide, you need to make sure you have sufficient space for the one you decide on buying. The up side is that you can install it anywhere, whether in your laundry room (space permitting), on the patio, your deck, or even on your lawn. Where you put it is up to you, so long as the area is level. Because they are portable, you can even change your location.
The model of Intex Pure Spa comes with a bubble jet which blows powerful air bubbles into the water. As you enjoy soaking, you can turn this on and get a full body massage. This in itself can help you relieve stress. But what if you have some lower back pains that you need to specifically target? Fortunately, with just a touch of a button, you can run the high-pressure massage jets to target these areas.
Considering all the hard work that goes into putting up a regular hot tub, an inflatable one is easy to own and maintain. You inflate it and add water, and you have a great soak spot. You don’t even need more than one person for the job; you can set up your hot tub on your own in the comfort of your home without a struggle. On the other hand, there is no avoiding the use of hot tub experts when you want to install a regular hot tub unless you are an expert yourself.
To empty is pretty easy, you fasten your stopper caps to the valves on the inside of the spa, this will stop the water from escaping. Now remove the pump by loosening the connectors and attach a cap to outlet A. (These caps come with hot tub) Fix the hose adapter to your garden hose and attach both to connector B, make sure that the other end of your hose is at the drain then remove the lower cap from the inside of the spa. Once it’s empty make sure you dry it properly before you pack it away.
Keeping your inflatable hot tub at 102°, if your weather is 65° should only use about 4 kWh per day if it is used every day. So a scenario of $0.08 per kWh for 4 hours a day should be under $10 a month. A stationary hard hot tub costs much more to run and maintain which can cost anywhere between $38 to $80 per month depending on use, weather and insulation.
Have you been wondering whether you should invest in a portable hot tub with water jets? We’ve been looking at the SaluSpa Hawaii HydroJet which offers water jets as well as bubble jets so you can get the best of both worlds. We thought we would give you an overview of this hot tub and give you a list of pros and cons so that you can decide whether it might be the best portable hot tub for you. Read our full product review here.
An inflatable hot tub, to state the obvious, is filled with air and air is actually a very very good insulator. Think about double glazed windows. What makes them effective is a layer of air. We have already noted earlier that inflatable hot tubs have thick sidewalls, up to 10 inches thick. This actually provides great thermal protection from heat loss on the sides. Couple this fact with some insulation underneath the hot tub and a decent cover and you have a hot tub that is reasonably well protected from heat loss. Not as good as more expensive models but not to shabby either and one that can certainly be managed. 

When using a hot tub you need to use chemicals to keep the water safe from microorganisms that can make you ill. You can use chlorine or bromine for this but with a salt water chlorinating system in your tub it uses salt that you add to the water and turns it into chlorine by passing it over an electrolytic cell. The benefits of this come in the feel of the water which feels softer on the skin and leaves you feeling refreshed, the cost of the salt which will probably be cheaper than the chemicals. You still have to check your water for the chlorine levels but you won’t need to keep chemicals around as the chlorine in the water is naturally produced and doesn’t smell quite bad. You just add salt to the water and switch on the chlorinator until the levels match the suggested numbers in the manual provided.
In a worst case scenario the part that blows up the inflatable hot tub can malfunction, meaning that you’re left with a deflated piece of strong plastic. Portable hot tubs provide a great sense of security in that their main parts are the control panel and the heating element, which are all built into the tub itself. With inflatable hot tubs having a separate heater/blower, it takes something as simple as a person forgetting to pack it or that piece short circuiting to ruin everyone’s fun.
This portable hot tub comes with a cushioned air mat and a quick drain system among a variety of other interesting features. One such feature is the Lay-Z massage feature designed to soothe your skin through bubble jets, a type of massage you only get normally with high-end professional hot tubs. Furthermore, the tub comes with LED lights that shine in different cycles in seven different colors to make the whole experience more aesthetically pleasing.
You can pay up to £1,500 for an airjet inflatable spa, whereas this Lay Z Spa tub comes in at less than a third of that figure. While cheaper spas only fit 2 to 4, this product comfortably sits 4 to 6. The Vegas Hot Tub also has the latest, state of the art massage therapy, quick set up time and tidy design. It also has the advantage of looking great.
However, not everybody has the space, time or budget to have a permanent hot tub installed. This is where an inflatable portable hot tub comes in. We reviewed over 50 top products and our spa tub research showed one thing for certain. Whatever your circumstances, there should be a hot tub out there for you. Whether you're having a kids' birthday, you have a fitness regime to follow, or you just want to chill, an inflatable hot tub spa is the answer to your prayers. And then, after it's all over, you can take it down and put it away!
Like the name suggests, this is a 6-person portable hot tub that you can set up in less than 10 minutes if you follow the instructions to the letter. Among its many features, this tub has 88 massage air jets that will have you experiencing more or less the exact comfort you would experience in a standard indoor hot tub. Furthermore, due to its lightweight and portable nature, you can take this inflatable tub almost anywhere.
Maybe it’s most annoying feature is that it seems to shut off automatically after 72 hours. So you have to reset it every few days. But other than that, it’s fine. It offers the very basic service of an inflatable hot tub, and you get the soothing bubbles as a bonus. The comparatively fast heating system is also a treat, especially with a tub this cheap. It’s one of the best inflatable hot tub models you can get at this price range.
According to the Hot Tub Barn, there are a number of factors that benefit the body when it comes to relaxing in a Jacuzzi. One of the most obvious is the relive of stress, whether that’s after a long day or difficult gym session. Stress can cause muscle tension, headaches, fatigue and soreness. Secondly, it eases the pain of arthritis as it’s an excellent way to apply heat to the joints which can decrease pain and reduce stiffness. Lastly, in clinical studies, patients who used a hot tub lost slightly more weight without any diet or exercise programme. This is caused by the hot water simulating the effects of exercise on the muscles.

Usually costing around $4,000 to $9,000 depending on type and size and location to be installed. But going the inflatable spa way will run you around $500, with no setup costs. And if you will only be using it part of the year, you simply deflate it and store it away. There are no costs of maintaining it to keep it from looking like something that the creature from the black lagoon would like to hide out in. Oh, and did we mention, to heat it up and keep it heated will run around $8-$12 a month depending on your electricity prices per kWh.
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