Most portable hot tubs don’t come with seats included, they are available as accessories but it is an added cost. This spa is 26 inches deep as isn’t filled to the top, for most adults this might not be a problem unless you are not very tall where the height of the water may be a little uncomfortable. You can buy seats for in the spa to raise your height and they are good for kids too.
The heater once turned on, heats up the water at a rate of 2 degrees per hour. You can set the temperature beforehand, leave it overnight or during the day while you’re at work, then come home and soak in your desired water temperature. As with other models, this Intex portable spa comes with an insulated cover to keep the water clean while not in use. The cover also helps to keep the heat in until the time you decide to soak.
When it comes to inflatable spas, there are many positive and negative considerations that you must take in mind. Factors such as your particular tastes, specific situation, and how/when the hot tub will be used will help you make the perfect decision on which one to purchase. The following are the pros and cons of an inflatable spa to weigh in on during the buying procedure.

For the last 40 years or so, the Intex family of companies has made spas, pools, airbeds, and other types of furniture and accessories. Their first inflatable item was a beach ball, and they made their first above-ground swimming pool in 1997. Intex spa tub products can be found in more than 100 countries all over the world. The Intex spa reviews are generally positive.
The exterior is made from a specially coated fabric that is suited to withstand the outdoor elements. It is the classic Coleman-brand green. (This is usually their hallmark color for many of their products.) It also comes with a green fabric cover that is lined with aluminum material. The aluminum coating serves to keep the water warm while you’re waiting to jump in.
The downfall would be the amount of time it takes the heat the water, even with the rapid heating system. This is a downfall that almost all of the inflatable tubs are going to have.  In 24 hours, the water will heat up to a maximum of 104 degrees. Some have reported that filling it with hot water to start off will raise the temperate in only six hours, but if you take this route, you’ll be spending more money on hot water.

The price is a marvel, and it’s very democratic. What it really means is that the inflatable hot tub experience is really no long exclusive for the well-off. How long will it take you to save $400 for a tub? Probably not all that long, right. And it doesn’t add much to your electricity bill, with some people saying it will add about $80 to you monthly electricity expenses. That’s for keeping it ready every day!
Portable or not, an inflatable hot tub still represents a significant investment. Inexpensive models run around $300 or so, and high-end inflatable spas can cost $1000 or more. Before you get ready to spend that kind of money, you should have a pretty good idea of how often you intend on using it. Spending $900 to soak in a hot tub once a month is a poor investment.
This is best for the people who aren’t really all that impressed with the massage jets. That’s not all that strange because many Intex portable spa reviews consider the hot water in itself as the main therapeutic and relaxing feature of the tub. If you don’t care about the massage features, then that’s fine. After all, you can always think of that feature as another thing that can go wrong in the Intex inflatable hot tub.
When using a hot tub you need to use chemicals to keep the water safe from microorganisms that can make you ill. You can use chlorine or bromine for this but with a salt water chlorinating system in your tub it uses salt that you add to the water and turns it into chlorine by passing it over an electrolytic cell. The benefits of this come in the feel of the water which feels softer on the skin and leaves you feeling refreshed, the cost of the salt which will probably be cheaper than the chemicals. You still have to check your water for the chlorine levels but you won’t need to keep chemicals around as the chlorine in the water is naturally produced and doesn’t smell quite bad. You just add salt to the water and switch on the chlorinator until the levels match the suggested numbers in the manual provided.

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