Like most other product review sites, ConsumerSearch is supported by a combination of commissions on the sale of the products we recommend and ads that are placed on our site by Google. If you find something you like, you can help support us by clicking through and buying the products we pick. Our editorial process is independent and unbiased; we don’t accept product samples, requests for reviews or product mentions, or direct advertising.
Once you put in a built-in hot tub in its place, it stays there. That’s literally what “built in” means. So if you put it outdoors, you’re not really going to be able to enjoy it during the cold winter season when snow keeps falling. And if you out it indoors, it’s not as enjoyable during the warm summer months when it’s nice to take a dip at night while enjoying a nice summer breeze. With an inflatable hot tub, you can put it indoors during the winter and outdoors in the summer. Or you can just put it in storage when you’re not going to use it for a while.

One of the major advantages of an inflatable hot tub is its portability. It can be setup in your backyard during summer months or rolled up and stored away during winter months. Most inflatable hot tubs will come with air pumps that will allow you to inflate and deflate within a few minutes. This portability also means that you can take the device on vacations and it can also be easily disassembled if you are moving houses.
If you do like to move it around regularly, which is the strongest advantage for inflatable hot tubs, you have to deal with draining, deflating, moving, inflating, and refilling your tub every time you want to move it. The deflating and inflating isn’t as big of a deal if you have an air compressor to hook up to it, or if your hot tub came with its own, but it still takes a while (and a good deal of water) to refill that hot tub every time, and longer yet to get the water hot.
×