When fully inflated the hot tub has a diameter of 77-inches (note: there's a 85-in option) which gives its bathers a good seating position and enough legroom. The beauty of this feature is that it doesn’t consume much space compared to larger inflatable and non-portable hot tubs. As such you can place it even in your patio or a patch of grass in your backyard.
Keeping your inflatable hot tub at 102°, if your weather is 65° should only use about 4 kWh per day if it is used every day. So a scenario of $0.08 per kWh for 4 hours a day should be under $10 a month. A stationary hard hot tub costs much more to run and maintain which can cost anywhere between $38 to $80 per month depending on use, weather and insulation.
Hot tub spas are very popular, and becoming more so by the day. This is because they have an awful lot of benefits in a stressful world. They have been used for centuries in many civilisations, from Ancient Rome to Arctic Scandinavia. They relieve stress, bring people together, ease tension renew energy. All of these positive advantages are being highlighted by scientists as free and easy ways of making life longer and better.
Inflatable hot tubs consume a lot of water, up to 250 gallons (almost 1000 L) so people will not be happy changing it every week as the water bill will become quite salty. On the other hand, the same water can’t be used forever, so soon or later you will have to replace it, but it all will depend on how often the inflatable hot tub is used and how well you treat the water.
The Intex Pure Spa Jet & Bubble Deluxe Portable Hot Tub is an example of a hot tub that sports a combination of 120 bubble jets and 4 high performance massage jets. These massage jets produce a much more powerful stream of water which can be used to soothe needy parts of the body. The massage jets do provide a more restorative feature than the bubble jets alone The jets are located about halfway up the inner wall and are positioned well to give your back a nice massage. Again just don’t expect too much. You won’t get the same experience from a $400 spa as you would a $10,000 one.
One person can set up an inflatable hot tub, whereas as a construction crew of plumbers, electricians and possibly even a crane operator is needed for a hard hot tub. Also, a hard acrylic hot tub will weigh between 400-900 lbs. (181-408 kg.) so moving it around is not an option. On the other hand, an inflatable hot tub can be drained and rolled to another location.
All wallpapers and backgrounds found here are believed to be in the “public domain”. Most of the images displayed are of unknown origin. We do not intend to infringe any legitimate intellectual right, artistic rights or copyright. If you are the rightful owner of any of the pictures/wallpapers posted here, and you do not want it to be displayed or if you require a suitable credit, then please CONTACT US and we will immediately do whatever is needed either for the image to be removed or provide credit where it is due.
Conventional tubs are extremely expensive, meaning that they are an impossible investment for most people. On the other hand, inflating models come at considerably lower prices, some even costing one-tenth of the price of a traditional tub. This is an advantage worth taking into consideration because you will not only save a huge amount of money, but you will do this without sacrificing quality at all. Also, the lack of hassle when assembling and installing them is worth taking into account. In addition, the easy installation means that you will save money because you won’t need to hire a plumber or an electrician for this task.

However, not everybody has the space, time or budget to have a permanent hot tub installed. This is where an inflatable portable hot tub comes in. We reviewed over 50 top products and our spa tub research showed one thing for certain. Whatever your circumstances, there should be a hot tub out there for you. Whether you're having a kids' birthday, you have a fitness regime to follow, or you just want to chill, an inflatable hot tub spa is the answer to your prayers. And then, after it's all over, you can take it down and put it away!
So like we touched on already, the main safety feature is a cover. This cover provides more than just a source of keeping the heat in and the dirt out, but it is for safety. With an inflatable hot tub, most will come with an inflatable locking top. The top will be sturdy and will be strong enough to stand on when properly in place and locked, although we don’t recommend dancing on top of it.
Flimsy construction. Sources agree that inflatable hot tubs aren't very durable. According to the editors of HotTubSpaRatings.com, "as a shell material vinyl is easy to damage, especially if the chemical balance of the water remains out of ideal range for very long." Poor durability is one of the most common complaints about inflatable hot tubs in user reviews, though many also report better experiences. These tubs typically come with a one-year warranty.
Bromine does have certain qualities that make it better than chlorine, as discussed in a recent blog, Bromine vs. Chlorine in hot tubs. He points out that bromine is more stable at higher temperatures and pH levels. But most of the argument is made against tablet chlorine, not chlorine generated from salt. Although generated chlorine is still chlorine, it has fewer downsides than using tablet or granular chlorine.
Because a plug and play hot tub is not hard wired into a permanent outside gfci box it makes it easier to take with you if you ever move. Or if your a renter you can have a hot tub and take it with you when you buy a house or rent another one! Generally plug and play spas are smaller and lighter making them much more portable and easy move, but not having to worry about installing another 220v electrical service at your next home makes the move easier as well.
You can always trust Coleman to offer a simple product for your portable outdoor needs, so it shouldn’t be surprising to find that they also offer an inflatable hot tub. This one is also very affordable at about $375. Quite a lot of Lazy Spa reviews mention that the Lazy Spa inflatable hot tub from Coleman isn’t all that different from the Lazy Spa hot tub from Bestway.
The second most common complaint was the failure of the pump operation. Unfortunately, for these negative reviewers, the pump stopped working after only a few uses. Once they survived the customer service experience, the were granted warranty clearance and given a new pump. However, it was an annoying experience for them to have to replace the pump so early into the process.
The cost of running an inflatable hot tub depends on a few major factors: electricity, water, filters, cleaning and chemicals. To a lesser degree, other factors will contribute to hot tub maintenance costs, like its size, where you set it up, how often you use it and how strict you are about cleaning it. Electricity costs vary by state, so running a hot tub may be less expensive in Louisiana residents than in Alaska or Hawaii.
Salt systems, for pools or spas, have trouble producing chlorine at low water temperatures. When water temperatures drop into the 60s, very little chlorine output is generated, even though your salt cell is working overtime. Many salt systems will shut down, in a self-protection mode, when low water temps are sensed. This of course, is not a big deal for spas and hot tubs, so long as you keep the water 65° F or higher. Do this, and you’ll have no problems.

Usually costing around $4,000 to $9,000 depending on type and size and location to be installed. But going the inflatable spa way will run you around $500, with no setup costs. And if you will only be using it part of the year, you simply deflate it and store it away. There are no costs of maintaining it to keep it from looking like something that the creature from the black lagoon would like to hide out in. Oh, and did we mention, to heat it up and keep it heated will run around $8-$12 a month depending on your electricity prices per kWh.

×