Just in case you have a vision in your head of blowing this thing up like a beach ball then let me clear that up for you, the control pump supplied with this hot tub to run it is also used to inflate it. You need to find a space where you want place your hot tub, it needs to be flat with access to an electricity outlet. They have made sure with this tub to have the outlets marked up so it is easy to couple it with the pump. Firstly though you need to inflate it by connecting the inflation adapter and hose to the tub and the pump and press the bubble button to blow air into it. You will know you have sufficient air in it when it is firm to the touch.
At first, we were unsure of an inflatable hot tub. We were even concerned that it may look cheap or not hold up. I mean you get this vision of someone sitting on the edge and it popping, flooding your backyard during a relaxing time or a fun party. But after doing our research and now becoming owners, well, just let that vision fade away because that is not what these inflatable Lay-Z-Spa hot tubs are all about.
When using a hot tub you need to use chemicals to keep the water safe from microorganisms that can make you ill. You can use chlorine or bromine for this but with a salt water chlorinating system in your tub it uses salt that you add to the water and turns it into chlorine by passing it over an electrolytic cell. The benefits of this come in the feel of the water which feels softer on the skin and leaves you feeling refreshed, the cost of the salt which will probably be cheaper than the chemicals. You still have to check your water for the chlorine levels but you won’t need to keep chemicals around as the chlorine in the water is naturally produced and doesn’t smell quite bad. You just add salt to the water and switch on the chlorinator until the levels match the suggested numbers in the manual provided.
Backyard Flexibility. Keeping your pool and your spa entirely separate allows for more flexibility in the design of your backyard oasis. For example, your spa can be located on or in your deck, while your pool lies down a garden path from your deck’s stairs. Your children can play in the pool while you relax in the hot tub, enjoying your calm retreat.

Another drawback to certain models of inflatable hot tubs is the location of the filter or filters. While many models place the filter right inside the heater/pump unit for quick access, some models place the filters along the bottom inner portion of the spa, so changing them becomes a much more involved process than just opening the pump unit and popping in a new filter.
Cover: if you spot a model that includes the cover, it is a plus, however don’t take the cover of an average model as an advantage just because it has a cover. They are quite important to keep your tub not only hotter for longer but also to protect the water from getting contaminated with sitting dust and any other contaminants from the air, from leaves to insects that may be really looking for water. Most brands that don’t include the cover sell it separately.

And since you will be using the same water for a long while, all the best models come with a chemical floater dispenser which will treat the water and block the formation of algae deposits.All inflatable hot tubs come with the pump system to inflate the set, and all that is automated, so all you have to do is connect the tubes and let it inflate by itself. These hot tubs also are designed with an electrical controller to set all adjustments of water temperature, stirring and filtering for the amount of time you wish.
This is where the portable hot tub may have a problem if it isn’t the type that can be dissembled. Carrying around a full sized hot tub to a new location in or around your home is not fun if you can’t break it down into smaller pieces. There will also be places that no matter what you do, it will never be able to go. This can be avoided by purchasing an inflatable system or a portable system that can be taken apart easily.

In terms of performance, this product is hard to surpass as it provides a truly rapid heating system of approximately 2-3 degrees Fahrenheit per hour. Thus, the water inside it will be comfortable to sit in very quick. It features a timer that enhances efficiency and power draw, ensuring it won’t run for longer than you need it to. As it uses 120 air jets and 8 hydro jets, you will be provided with a soothing massage experience when you sit in the tub. It is able to heat the water up to 104 degrees Fahrenheit, and the maximum water capacity it boasts is 210 gallons. Additionally, it provides a hefty 320 gallons per hour flow rate.


There are numerous advantages and just as many disadvantages that one has to consider while looking to purchase an inflatable hot tub. Their specific situation, how and when they intend to use the hot tub as well as their specific taste will help them come to a decision. Below are some tips to consider before you make your final decision to buy or not.
According to the Hot Tub Barn, there are a number of factors that benefit the body when it comes to relaxing in a Jacuzzi. One of the most obvious is the relive of stress, whether that’s after a long day or difficult gym session. Stress can cause muscle tension, headaches, fatigue and soreness. Secondly, it eases the pain of arthritis as it’s an excellent way to apply heat to the joints which can decrease pain and reduce stiffness. Lastly, in clinical studies, patients who used a hot tub lost slightly more weight without any diet or exercise programme. This is caused by the hot water simulating the effects of exercise on the muscles.
Another drawback to certain models of inflatable hot tubs is the location of the filter or filters. While many models place the filter right inside the heater/pump unit for quick access, some models place the filters along the bottom inner portion of the spa, so changing them becomes a much more involved process than just opening the pump unit and popping in a new filter.
There is a safety function built in to this pump system which automatically goes into hibernation if no button is pressed in 72 hours. If you have the heater system setup on timer and you don’t actually use the hot tub and press a button for 3 days it will turn off meaning a long re-heat if you don’t notice. This is less of a problem if you use your hot tub daily, but if you are a weekend user this can be a pain if you forget to go out and press a button to let it know you’re still there.
For most of us, the desire to have your own inflatable hot tub comes when the temperature begins to drop and the weather becomes colder. You long for the times when you could easily lounge in a Jacuzzi at your favorite spa salon. But often, the cost for professional spa treatments can add up over time prompting you to just stay indoors and cozy up next to your heater instead. However, those days are long gone. A practical option available for you now is to purchase your own inflatable portable hot tub.
Now for the Intex PureSpa tub. The most popular, positive remark on this hot tub of choice is the fact that it operates like a real hot tub. Many of these customers were hesitant to purchase this product at first for the fear that it would not work like a true hot tub and thus be a waste of good, hard-earned money. The Intex hot tub proved their worries to be wrong.
The walls are made with six-layer reinforced PVC designed to resist tears and leaking, and the inside supports 108 relaxing air jets for soothing hydrotherapy and pain relief. The spa also features a built-in heater for more convenient design, and features an LED control panel close at hand that makes it easy to activate the jets or manage the temperature inside the spa.
An inflatable hot tub, to state the obvious, is filled with air and air is actually a very very good insulator. Think about double glazed windows. What makes them effective is a layer of air. We have already noted earlier that inflatable hot tubs have thick sidewalls, up to 10 inches thick. This actually provides great thermal protection from heat loss on the sides. Couple this fact with some insulation underneath the hot tub and a decent cover and you have a hot tub that is reasonably well protected from heat loss. Not as good as more expensive models but not to shabby either and one that can certainly be managed. 

Usually costing around $4,000 to $9,000 depending on type and size and location to be installed. But going the inflatable spa way will run you around $500, with no setup costs. And if you will only be using it part of the year, you simply deflate it and store it away. There are no costs of maintaining it to keep it from looking like something that the creature from the black lagoon would like to hide out in. Oh, and did we mention, to heat it up and keep it heated will run around $8-$12 a month depending on your electricity prices per kWh.
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